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Job 27:4

    Job 27:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    My lips shall not speak wickedness, nor my tongue utter deceit.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    My lips shall not speak wickedness, nor my tongue utter deceit.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Surely my lips shall not speak unrighteousness, Neither shall my tongue utter deceit.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Truly, there is no deceit in my lips, and my tongue does not say what is false.

    Webster's Revision

    Surely my lips shall not speak unrighteousness, Neither shall my tongue utter deceit.

    World English Bible

    surely my lips shall not speak unrighteousness, neither shall my tongue utter deceit.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Surely my lips shall not speak unrighteousness, neither shall my tongue utter deceit.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 27:4

    My lips shall not speak wickedness - As I have hitherto lived in all good conscience before God, as he knoweth, so will I continue to live.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 27:4

    My lips shall not speak wickedness - This solemn profession made on oath might have done something to allay the suspicions of his friends in regard to him, and to show that they had been mistaken in his character. It is a solemn assurance that he did not mean to vindicate the cause of wickedness, or to say one word in its favor; and that as long as he lived he would never be found advocating it.

    Nor my tongue utter deceit - I will never make any use of sophistry; I will not attempt to make "the worse appear the better reason;" I will not be the advocate of error. This had always been the aim of Job, and he now says that no circumstance should ever induce him to pursue a different course as long as he lived. Probably he means, also, as the following verse seems to imply, that no consideration should ever induce him to countenance error or to palliate wrong. He would not be deterred from expressing his sentiments by any dread of opposition, or even by any respect for his friends. No friendship which he might have for them would induce him to justify what he honestly regarded as error.
    Book: Job