Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Job 28:3

    Job 28:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    He setteth an end to darkness, and searcheth out all perfection: the stones of darkness, and the shadow of death.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    He sets an end to darkness, and searches out all perfection: the stones of darkness, and the shadow of death.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Man'setteth an end to darkness, And searcheth out, to the furthest bound, The stones of obscurity and of thick darkness.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Man puts an end to the dark, searching out to the farthest limit the stones of the deep places of the dark.

    Webster's Revision

    Man'setteth an end to darkness, And searcheth out, to the furthest bound, The stones of obscurity and of thick darkness.

    World English Bible

    Man sets an end to darkness, and searches out, to the furthest bound, the stones of obscurity and of thick darkness.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Man setteth an end to darkness, and searcheth out to the furthest bound the stones of thick darkness and of the shadow of death.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 28:3

    He setteth an end to darkness - As it is likely Job still refers to mining, the words above may be understood as pointing out the persevering industry of man in penetrating into the bowels of the earth, in order to seek for metals and precious stones. Even the stones that lay hidden in the bowels of the earth he has digged for and brought to light, and has penetrated in directions in which the solar light could not be transmitted; so that he appears to have gone to the regions of the shadow of death. Mr. Good translates: "Man delveth into the region of darkness; and examineth, to the uttermost limit, the stones of darkness and death-shade."

    Barnes' Notes on Job 28:3

    He setteth an end to darkness - That is, man does. The reference here is undoubtedly to the operations of mining, and the idea is, that man delves into the darkest regions; he goes even to the outer limits of darkness; he penetrates everywhere. Probably the allusion is derived from the custom of carrying torches into mines.

    And searcheth out all perfection - Makes a complete search; examines everything; carries the matter to the utmost. The idea is not that he searches out all perfection - as our translation would seem to convey; but that he makes a complete and thorough search - and yet after all he does not come to the true and highest wisdom.

    The stones of darkness - The last stone, says Herder, in the mining investigations in the time of Job; the corner or boundary stone, as it were, of the kingdom of darkness and night. Prof. Lee supposes that there is allusion here to the fact that stones were used as "weights," and that the idea is, that man had ascertained the "exact weight" of the gross darkness, that is, had taken an accurate admeasurement of it, or had wholly investigated it. But this solution seems far-fetched. Schultens supposes the center of the earth to be denoted by this expression. But it seems to me that the words "stone" and "darkness" are to be separated, and that the one is not used to qualify the other. The sense is, that man searches out everything; he perfectly and accurately penetrates everywhere, and examines all objects; "the stone" (אבן 'eben), that is, the rocks, the mines; "the darkness" (אפל 'ôphel), that is, the darkness of the cavern, the interior of the earth; "and the shadow of death" (צלמות tsalmâveth), that is, the most dark and impenetrable regions of the earth. So it is rendered by Coverdale: "The stones, the dark, and the horrible shadow."

    Wesley's Notes on Job 28:3

    28:3 Perfection - Whatever is deeply wrought in the deepest caverns. Stones of darkness - The precious stones which lie hid in the dark bowels of the earth, where no living thing can dwell.
    Book: Job