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Job 3:13

    Job 3:13 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For now should I have lain still and been quiet, I should have slept: then had I been at rest,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For now should I have lain still and been quiet, I should have slept: then had I been at rest,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For now should I have lain down and been quiet; I should have slept; then had I been at rest,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For then I might have gone to my rest in quiet, and in sleep have been in peace,

    Webster's Revision

    For now should I have lain down and been quiet; I should have slept; then had I been at rest,

    World English Bible

    For now should I have lain down and been quiet. I should have slept, then I would have been at rest,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For now should I have lain down and been quiet; I should have slept; then had I been at rest:

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 3:13

    For now should I have lain still - In that case I had been insensible; quiet - without these overwhelming agitations; slept - unconscious of evil; been at rest - been out of the reach of calamity and sorrow.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 3:13

    For now should I have lain still - In this verse Job uses four expressions to describe the state in which be would have been if he had been so happy as to have died when an infant. It is evidently a very pleasant subject to him, and he puts it in a great variety of form. He uses thc words which express the most quiet repose, a state of perfect rest, a gentle slumber; and then in the next verses he says, that instead of being in the miserable condition in which he then was, he would have been in the same state with kings and the most illustrious men of the earth.

    I should have lain still - - שׁכב shâkab. I should have been "lying down," as one does who is taking grateful repose. This is a word of less strength than any of those which follow.

    And been quiet - - שׁקט shâqaṭ. A word of stronger signification than that before used. It means to rest, to lie down, to have quiet. It is used of one who is never troubled, harassed, or infested by others, Judges 3:11; Judges 5:31; Judges 8:25; and of one who has no fear or dread, Psalm 76:9. The meaning is, that he would not only have lain down, but; would have been perfectly tranquil. Nothing would have harassed him, nothing would have given him any annoyance.

    I should have slept - - ישׁן yâshên. This expression also is in advance of those before used. There would not only have been "quiet," but there would have been a calm and gentle slumber. Sleep is often representcd as "the kinsman of death." Thus, Virgil speaks of it:

    "Tum consanguineus Leti sopor - "

    Aeneid vi. 278.

    So Homer:

    Enth' hupnō cumblēto chasignēto thanatoio -

    Iliad, 14:231.

    This comparsion is an obvious one, and is frequently used in the Classical writers. It is employed to denote the calmness, stillness, and quiet of death. In the Scriptures it frequently occurs, and with a significancy far more beautiful. It is there employed not only to denote the tranquility of death, but also to denote the Christian hopes of a resurrection and the prospect of being awakened out of the long sleep. We lie down to rest at night with the hopes of awaking again. We sleep calmly, with the expectation that it will be only a temporary repose, and that we shall be aroused, invigorated for augmented toil, and refreshed for sweeter pleasure. So the Christian lies down in the grave. So the infant is committed to the calm slumber of the tomb. It may be a sleep stretching on through many nights and weeks and years and centuries, and even cycles of ages, but it is not eternal. The eyes will be opened again to behold the beauties of creation; the ear will be unstoppod to hear the sweet voice of fricndship and the harmony of music; and the frame will be raised up beautiful and immortal to engage in the service of the God that made us; compare Psalm 13:3; Psalm 90:5; John 11:11; 1 Corinthians 15:51; 1 Thessalonians 4:14; 1 Thessalonians 5:10. Whether Job used the word in this sense and with this understanding, has been made a matter of question, and will be considered more fully in the examination of the passage in Job 19:25-27.

    Then had I been at rest - Instead of the troubles and anxieties which I now experience. That is, he would have been lying in calm and honorable repose with the kings and princes of the earth.
    Book: Job