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Job 3:18

    Job 3:18 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    There the prisoners rest together; they hear not the voice of the oppressor.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    There the prisoners rest together; they hear not the voice of the oppressor.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    There the prisoners are at ease together; They hear not the voice of the taskmaster.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    There the prisoners are at peace together; the voice of the overseer comes not again to their ears.

    Webster's Revision

    There the prisoners are at ease together; They hear not the voice of the taskmaster.

    World English Bible

    There the prisoners are at ease together. They don't hear the voice of the taskmaster.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    There the prisoners are at ease together; they hear not the voice of the taskmaster.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 3:18

    The prisoners rest together - Those who were slaves, feeling all the troubles, and scarcely tasting any of the pleasures of life, are quiet in the grave together; and the voice of the oppressor, the hard, unrelenting task-master, which was more terrible than death, is heard no more. They are free from his exactions, and his mouth is silent in the dust. This may be a reference to the Egyptian bondage. The children of Israel cried by reason of their oppressors or task-masters.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 3:18

    There the prisoners rest together - Herder translates this, "There the prisoners rejoice in their freedom." The Septuagint strangely enough, "There they of old (ὁ αἰώνιοι hoi aiōnioi) assembled together (ὁμοθυμαδόν homothumadon) have not heard the voice of the exactor." The Hebrew word שׁאן shâ'an means "to rest, to be quiet, to be tranquil"; and the sense is, that they are in the grave freed from chains and oppressions.

    They hear not the voice of the oppressor - Of him who exacted taxes, and who laid on them heavy burdens, and who imprisoned them for imaginary crimes. He who is bound in chains, and who has no other prospect of release, can look for it in the grave and will find it there. Similar sentiments are found respecting death in Seneca, ad Marcian, 20: "Mots omnibus finis, multis remedium, quibusdam votum; haec servitutem invito domino remittit; haec captivorum catenas levat; haec a carcere reducit, quos exire imperium impofens vetuerat; haec exulibus, in pairtam semper animum oculosque tendentibus, ostendit, nibil interesse inter quos quisque jaceat; haec, ubi res communes fortuna male divisit, et aequo jure genitos allure alii donavit, exaequat omnia; haec est, quae nihil quidquam alieno fecit arbitrio; haec est, ea qua nemo humilitatem guam sensit; haec est, quae nuili paruit." The sense in Job is, that all are at liberty in death. Chains no longer bind; prisons no longer incarccrate; the voice of oppression no longer alarms.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 3:18

    3:18 The oppressor - Or, taskmaster, who urges and forces them to work by cruel threatenings and stripes. Job meddles not here with their eternal state after death, of which he speaks hereafter, but only their freedom from worldly troubles, which is the sole matter of his present discourse.
    Book: Job