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Job 3:19

    Job 3:19 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The small and great are there; and the servant is free from his master.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The small and great are there; and the servant is free from his master.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The small and the great are there: And the servant is free from his master.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The small and the great are there, and the servant is free from his master.

    Webster's Revision

    The small and the great are there: And the servant is free from his master.

    World English Bible

    The small and the great are there. The servant is free from his master.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The small and great are there; and the servant is free from his master.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 3:19

    The small and great are there - All sorts and conditions of men are equally blended in the grave, and ultimately reduced to one common dust; and between the bond and free there is no difference. The grave is

    "The appointed place of rendezvous, where all These travelers meet."

    Equality is absolute among the sons of men in their entrance into and exit from the world: all the intermediate state is disparity. All men begin and end life alike; and there is no difference between the king and the cottager.

    A contemplation of this should equally humble the great and the small.

    The saying is trite, but it is true: -

    Pallida mors aequo pulsat pede pauperum tabernas,

    Regumque turres.

    Hor. Odar. lib. i., Od. iv., ver. 13.

    "With equal pace impartial Fate

    Knocks at the palace as the cottage gate."

    Death is that state,"Where they an equal honor shareWho buried or unburied are.Where Agamemnon knows no moreThan Irus he contemn'd before.Where fair Achilles and Thersites lie,Equally naked, poor, and dry."

    And why do not the living lay these things to heart?

    There is a fine saying in Seneca ad Marciam, cap. 20, on this subject, which may serve as a comment on this place: Mors-servitutem invito domino remittit; haec captivorum catenas levat; haec e carcere eduxit, quos exire imperium impotens vetuerat. Haec est in quo nemo humilitatem suam sensit; haec quae nulli paruit; haec quae nihil quicquam alieno fecit arbitrio. Haec, ubi res communes fortuna male divisit, et aequo jure genitos alium alii donavit, exaequat omnia. - "Death, in spite of the master, manumits the slave. It loosens the chains of the prisoners. It brings out of the dungeon those whom impotent authority had forbidden to go at large. This is the state in which none is sensible of his humiliation. Death obeys no man. It does nothing according to the will of another. It reduces, by a just law, to a state of equality, all who in their families and circumstances had unequal lots in life."

    Barnes' Notes on Job 3:19

    The small and the great are there - The old and the young, the high and the low. Death levels all. It shows no respect to age; it spares none because they are vigorous, young, or beautiful. This sentiment has probably been expressed in various forms in all languages, for all people are made deeply sensible of its truth. The Classic reader will recall the ancient proverb,

    Mors sceptra ligonibus aequat,

    And the language of Horace:

    Aequae lege Necessitas

    Sortitur insignes et imos.

    Omne capax movet urna nomen.

    Tristis unda scilicet omnibus,

    Quicunque terrae munere vescimur,

    Enaviganda, sive reges,

    Sive inopes erimus coloni.

    Divesne prisco natus ab lnacho

    Nil interest, an pauper et infima

    De gente sub dio moreris

    Victima nil miserantis Orci.

    continued...

    Wesley's Notes on Job 3:19

    3:19 Small and great - Persons of all qualities and conditions. Are there - In the same place and state, all those distinctions being forever abolished. A good reason, why those who have power should use it moderately, and those that are in subjection should take it patiently.
    Book: Job