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Job 3:3

    Job 3:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Let the day perish wherein I was born, and the night in which it was said, There is a man child conceived.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Let the day perish wherein I was born, and the night in which it was said, There is a man child conceived.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Let the day perish wherein I was born, And the night which said, There is a man-child conceived.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Let destruction take the day of my birth, and the night on which it was said, A man child has come into the world.

    Webster's Revision

    Let the day perish wherein I was born, And the night which said, There is a man-child conceived.

    World English Bible

    "Let the day perish in which I was born, the night which said, 'There is a boy conceived.'

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Let the day perish wherein I was born, and the night which said, There is a man child conceived.

    Definitions for Job 3:3

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 3:3

    There is a man-child conceived - The word הרה harah signifies to conceive; yet here, it seems, it should be taken in the sense of being born, as it is perfectly unlikely that the night of conception should be either distinctly known or published.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 3:3

    Let the day perish - "Perish the day! O that there had never been such a day! Let it be blotted from the memory of man! There is something singularly bold, sublime, and "wild" in this exclamation. It is a burst of feeling where there had been long restraint, and where now it breaks forth in the most vehement and impassioned manner. The word "perish" here יאבד yo'bad expresses the "optative," and indicates strong desire. So the Septuagint, Ἀπόλοιτο Apoloito, "may it perish," or be destroyed; compare Job 10:18. "O that I had given up the ghost." Dr. Good says of this exclamation, "There is nothing that I know of, ia ancient or modern poetry, equal to the entire burst, whether in the wildness and horror of the imprecations. or the terrible sublimity of its imagery." The boldest and most animated of the Hebrew poets have imitated it, and have expressed themselves in almost the same language, in scenes of distress. A remarkably similar expression of feeling is made by Jeremiah.

    Cursed be the day wherein I was born:

    Let not the day wherein my mother bare me be blessed!

    Cursed be the man who brought tidings to my father, saying,

    "A man child is born unto thee,"

    Making him very glad.

    Be that man as the cities which yahweh overthrew and repented not!

    Yea, let him hear the outcry in the morning,

    And the lamentation at noon day!

    Wesley's Notes on Job 3:3

    3:3 Let the day - Let the remembrance of that day be utterly lost.
    Book: Job