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Job 3:7

    Job 3:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Lo, let that night be solitary, let no joyful voice come therein.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    See, let that night be solitary, let no joyful voice come therein.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Lo, let that night be barren; Let no joyful voice come therein.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    As for that night, let it have no fruit; let no voice of joy be sounded in it;

    Webster's Revision

    Lo, let that night be barren; Let no joyful voice come therein.

    World English Bible

    Behold, let that night be barren. Let no joyful voice come therein.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Lo, let that night be barren; let no joyful voice come therein.

    Definitions for Job 3:7

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 3:7

    Lo, let that night be solitary - The word הנה hinneh, behold, or lo, is wanting in one of De Rossi's MSS., nor is it expressed in the Septuagint, Vulgate, Syriac, or Arabic. The word גלמוד galmud, which we translate solitary, is properly Arabic. From ghalama or jalama, signifying to cut off, make bare, amputate, comes jalmud, a rock, a great stone; and jalameedet, weight, a burden, trouble, from which we may gather Job's meaning: "Let that night be grievous, oppressive, as destitute of good as a bare rock is of verdure." The Targum gives the sense, In that night let there be tribulation.

    Let no joyful voice come therein - Let there be no choirs of singers; no pleasant music heard; no dancing or merriment. The word רננה renanah signifies any brisk movement, such as the vibration of the rays of light, or the brisk modulation of the voice in a cheerful ditty. The Targum has, Let not the crowing of the rural or wild cock resound in it. Let all work be intermitted; let there be no sportive exercises, and let all animals be totally silent.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 3:7

    Lo, let that night be solitary - Dr. Good, "O! that night! Let it be a barren rock!" Noyes, "O let that night be unfruitful!" Herder, "Let that night be set apart by itself." The Hebrew word used here גלמוּד galmûd means properly "hard;" then sterile, barren, as of a hard and rocky soil. It does not mean properly solitary, but that which is unproductive and unfruitful. It is used of a woman who is barren, Isaiah 49:21, and also of that which is lean, famished, emaciated with hunger; Job 15:34; Job 30:3. According to this it means that that should be a night in which none would be born - a night of loneliness and desolation. According to Jerome, it means that the night should be solitary, lonely, and gloomy; a night in which no one would venture forth to make a journey, and in which none would come together to rejoice. Thus interpreted the night would resemble that which is so beautifully describe by Virgil, Aeneid vi. 268:

    Ibant obscuri sola sub nocte per umbras,

    Perque domos Ditis vacuas et inania regna.

    It is probable, however, that the former is the correct interpretation.

    Let no joyful voice come therein - Let there be no sound of praise and rejoicing. The Chaldee paraphrases this," Let not the crowing of a cock be heard in it." The sense of the whole is, that Job wished that night to be wholly desolate. He wished there might be no assembling for amusement, congratulation, or praise, no marriage festivals, and no rejoicing at the birth of children; he would have it as noiseless, solitary, and sad, as if all animals and human beings were dead, and no voice were heard. It was a night hateful to him, and he would have it in no way remembered.
    Book: Job