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Job 30:1

    Job 30:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But now they that are younger than I have me in derision, whose fathers I would have disdained to have set with the dogs of my flock.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But now they that are younger than I have me in derision, whose fathers I would have disdained to have set with the dogs of my flock.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But now they that are younger than I have me in derision, Whose fathers I disdained to set with the dogs of my flock.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But now those who are younger than I make sport of me; those whose fathers I would not have put with the dogs of my flocks.

    Webster's Revision

    But now they that are younger than I have me in derision, Whose fathers I disdained to set with the dogs of my flock.

    World English Bible

    "But now those who are younger than I have me in derision, whose fathers I would have disdained to put with my sheep dogs.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But now they that are younger than I have me in derision, whose fathers I disdained to set with the dogs of my flock.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 30:1

    But now they that are younger than I have me in derision - Compare this with Job 29:8, where he speaks of the respect he had from the youth while in the days of his prosperity. Now he is no longer affluent, and they are no longer respectful.

    Dogs of my flock - Persons who were not deemed sufficiently respectable to be trusted with the care of those dogs which were the guardians of my flocks. Not confidential enough to be made shepherds, ass-keepers, or camel-drivers; nor even to have the care of the dogs by which the flocks were guarded. This saying is what we call an expression of sovereign contempt.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 30:1

    But now they that are younger than I-- Margin, "of fewer days." It is not probable that Job here refers to his three friends. It is not possible to determine their age with accuracy, but in Job 15:10, they claim that there were with them old and very aged men, much older than the father of Job. Though that place may possibly refer not to themselves but to those who held the same opinions with them, yet none of those who engaged in the discussion, except Ehhu Job 32:6, are represented as young men. They were the contemporaries of Job; men who are ranked as his friends; and men who showed that they had had oppoptunities for long and careful observation. The reference here, therefore, is to the fact that while, in the days of his prosperity, even the aged and the honorable rose up to do him reverence, now he was the object of contempt even by the young and the worthless. The Orientals would feel this much. It was among the chief virtues with them to show respect to the aged, and their sensibilites were especially keen in regard to any indignity shown to them by the young.

    Whose fathers I would have disdained - Who are the children of the lowest and most degraded of the community. How deep the calamity to be so fallen as to be the subject of derision by such men!

    To have set with the dogs of my flock - To have associated with my dogs in guarding my flock. That is, they were held in less esteem than his dogs. This was the lowest conceivable point of debasement. The Orientals had no language that would express greater contempt of anyone than to call him a dog; compare Deuteronomy 23:18; 1 Samuel 17:43; 1 Samuel 24:14; 2 Samuel 3:8; 2 Samuel 9:8; 2 Samuel 16:9; 2 Kings 8:13; Note Isaiah 66:3.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 30:1

    30:1 Younger - Whom both universal custom, and the light of nature, taught to reverence their elders and betters. Whose fathers - Whose condition was so mean, that in the opinion, of the world, they were unworthy to be my shepherds the companions of my dogs which watch my flocks.
    Book: Job