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Job 32:7

    Job 32:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I said, Days should speak, and multitude of years should teach wisdom.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I said, Days should speak, and multitude of years should teach wisdom.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    I said, Days should speak, And multitude of years should teach wisdom.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    I said to myself, It is right for the old to say what is in their minds, and for those who are far on in years to give out wisdom.

    Webster's Revision

    I said, Days should speak, And multitude of years should teach wisdom.

    World English Bible

    I said, 'Days should speak, and multitude of years should teach wisdom.'

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    I said, Days should speak, and multitude of years should teach wisdom.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 32:7

    Days should speak - That is, men are to be reputed wise and experienced in proportion to the time they have lived. The Easterns were remarkable for treasuring up wise sayings: indeed, the principal part of their boasted wisdom consisted in proverbs and maxims on different subjects.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 32:7

    I said, Days should speak - The aged ought to speak. They have had the advantage of long observation of the course of events; they are acquainted with the sentiments of past times; they may have had an opportunity of conversing with distinguished sages, and it is to them that we look up for counsel. This was eminently in accordance with the ancient Oriental views of what is right; and it is a sentiment which accords with what is obviously proper, however little it is regarded in modern times. It is one of the marks of urbanity and true politeness; of the prevalence of good breeding, morals, and piety, and of an advanced state of society, when respect is shown to the sentiments of the aged. They have had the opportunity of long observation. They have conversed much with people. They have seen the results of certain courses of conduct, and they have arrived at a period of life when they can look at the reality of things, and are uninfluenced now by passion. Returning respect for the sentiments of the aged, attention to their counsels, veneration for their persons, and deference for them when they speak, would be an indication of advancement in society in modern times; and there is scarcely anything in which we have deteriorated from the simplicity of the early ages, or in which we fall behind the Oriental world, so much as in the lack of this.
    Book: Job