Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Job 34:14

    Job 34:14 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    If he set his heart upon man, if he gather unto himself his spirit and his breath;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    If he set his heart on man, if he gather to himself his spirit and his breath;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    If he set his heart upon himself, If he gather unto himself his spirit and his breath;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    If he made his spirit come back to him, taking his breath into himself again,

    Webster's Revision

    If he set his heart upon himself, If he gather unto himself his spirit and his breath;

    World English Bible

    If he set his heart on himself, If he gathered to himself his spirit and his breath,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    If he set his heart upon man, if he gather unto himself his spirit and his breath;

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 34:14

    If he set his heart upon man - I think this and the following verse should be read thus: - "If he set his heart upon man, he will gather his soul and breath to himself; for all flesh shall perish together, and man shall turn again unto dust." On whomsoever God sets his heart, that is, his love, though his body shall perish and turn to dust, like the rest of men, yet his soul will God gather to himself.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 34:14

    If he set his heart upon man - Margin, as in Hebrew "upon him" - meaning "man." That is, if he fixes his attention particularly on him, or should form a purpose in regard him. The argument seems to be tbis. "If God wished such a thing, and should set his heart upon it, he could easily cut off the whole race. He has power to do it, and no one can deny him the right. Man has no claim to life, but he who gave it has a right to withdraw it, and the race is absolutely dependent on this infinite Sovereign. Being such a Sovereign, therefore, and having such a right, man cannot complain of his Maker as unjust, if he is called to pass through trials." Rosenmuller, however, supposes this is to be taken in the sense of severe scrutiny, and that it means, "If God should examine with strictness the life of man, and mark all his faults, no flesh would be allowed to live. All would be found to be guilty, and would be cut off." Grotius supposes it to mean, "If God should regard only himself; if he wished only to be good to himself - that is, to consult his own welfare, he would take away life from all, and live and reign alone." This is also the interpretation of Umbreit, Schnurrer, and Eichhorn. Noyes regards it as an argument drawn from the benevolence of God, meaning if God were severe, unjust, and revengeful, the earth would be a scene of universal desolation. It seems to me, however, that it is rather an argument from the absolute sovereignty or power of the Almighty, implying that man had no right to complain of the divine dealings in the loss of health, property, or friends; for if he chose he might sweep away the whole race, and leave the earth desolate.

    If he gather unto himself his spirit and his breath - The spirit of man is represented as having been originally given by God, and as returning to him when man dies; Ecclesiastes 12:7, "Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was; and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it."
    Book: Job