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Job 34:17

    Job 34:17 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Shall even he that hateth right govern? and wilt thou condemn him that is most just?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Shall even he that hates right govern? and will you condemn him that is most just?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Shall even one that hateth justice govern? And wilt thou condemn him that is righteous and mighty?-

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    How may a hater of right be a ruler? and will you say that the upright Ruler of all is evil?

    Webster's Revision

    Shall even one that hateth justice govern? And wilt thou condemn him that is righteous and mighty?-

    World English Bible

    Shall even one who hates justice govern? Will you condemn him who is righteous and mighty?--

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Shall even one that hateth right govern? and wilt thou condemn him that is just and mighty?

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 34:17

    Shall - he that hateth right govern? - Or, Shall he who hateth judgment, lie under obligation? It is preposterous to suppose that he who lives by no rule, should impose rules upon others. God, who is the fountain of all justice and righteousness, binds man by his laws; and wilt thou, therefore, pretend to condemn him who is the sum of righteousness?

    Barnes' Notes on Job 34:17

    Shall even he that hateth right govern? - Margin, as in Hebrew "bind." That is, shall he bind by laws. The argument in this verse seems to be an appeal to what must be the conviction of mankind, that God, the Great Governor of the universe, could not be unjust. This conviction, Elihu appears to have supposed, was so deep in the human mind, that he might appeal even to Job himself for its truth. The question here asked implies that it would be impossible to believe that one who was unjust could govern the universe. Such a supposition would be at variance with all the convictions of the human soul, and all the indications of the nature of his government to be found in his works.

    And wilt thou condemn him that is most just? - The great and holy Ruler of the universe. The argument here is, that Job had in fact placed himself in the attitude of condemning him who, from the fact that he was the Ruler of the universe, must be most just. The impropriety of this he shows in the following verses.
    Book: Job