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Job 34:18

    Job 34:18 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Is it fit to say to a king, Thou art wicked? and to princes, Ye are ungodly?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Is it fit to say to a king, You are wicked? and to princes, You are ungodly?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Him that saith to a king, Thou art vile, Or to nobles, Ye are wicked;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    He who says to a king, You are an evil-doer; and to rulers, You are sinners;

    Webster's Revision

    Him that saith to a king, Thou art vile, Or to nobles, Ye are wicked;

    World English Bible

    Who says to a king, 'Vile!' or to nobles, 'Wicked!'?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Is it fit to say to a king, Thou art vile? or to nobles, Ye are wicked?

    Definitions for Job 34:18

    Art - "Are"; second person singular.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 34:18

    Is it fit to say to a king, Thou art wicked? - The sentence is very short, and is thus translated by the Vulgate: Qui dicit regi, Apostata? Qui vocat duces impios? "Who says to a king, Apostate? Who calls leaders impious?" Literally, Who calls a king Belial? Who calls princes wicked? Civil governors should be treated with respect; no man should speak evil of the ruler of the people. This should never be permitted. Even where the man cannot be respected, because his moral conduct is improper, even there the office is sacred, and should be reverenced. He who permits himself to talk against the man, would destroy the office and authority, if he could.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 34:18

    Is it fit to say to a king, Thou art wicked? - The argument here is this: "There would be gross impropriety in arraigning the conduct of an earthly monarch, and using language severely condemning what he does. Respect is due to those of elevated rank. Their plans are often concealed. It is difficult to judge of them until they are fully developed. To condemn those plans, and to use the language of complaint, would not be tolerated, and would be grossly improper. How much more so when that language relates to the Great, the Infinite God, and to his eternal plans!" It may be added here, in accordance with the sentiment of Elihu, that people often indulge in thoughts and language about God which they would not tolerate respecting an earthly monarch.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 34:18

    34:18 Wicked - Though a king may be wicked, yet his subjects neither may nor dare call him so.
    Book: Job