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Job 34:36

    Job 34:36 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    My desire is that Job may be tried unto the end because of his answers for wicked men.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    My desire is that Job may be tried to the end because of his answers for wicked men.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Would that Job were tried unto the end, Because of his answering like wicked men.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    May Job be tested to the end, because his answers have been like those of evil men.

    Webster's Revision

    Would that Job were tried unto the end, Because of his answering like wicked men.

    World English Bible

    I wish that Job were tried to the end, because of his answering like wicked men.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Would that Job were tried unto the end, because of his answering like wicked men.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 34:36

    My desire is that Job may be tried unto the end - אבי יבחן איוב abi yibbachen Aiyob, "My father, let Job be tried." So the Vulgate, Pater mi, probetur Job. But it may be as in the common translation, I wish Job to be tried; or, as Mr. Good renders it, Verily, let Job be pursued to conquest for replying like wicked men. This is a very harsh wish: but the whole chapter is in the same spirit; nearly destitute of mildness and compassion. Who could suppose that such arguings could come out of the mouth of the loving Savior of mankind? The reader will recollect that a very pious divine has supposed Elihu to be Jesus Christ!

    Barnes' Notes on Job 34:36

    My desire is - Margin, "or, "my father, let Job be tried."" This variation between the text and the margin, arises from the different interpretations affixed to the Hebrew word אבי 'âbiy. The Hebrew word commonly means "father," and some have supposed that that sense is to be retained here, and then it would be a solemn appeal to God as his Father - expressing the earnest prayer of Elihu that Job might be fully tried. But the difficulties in this interpretation are obvious:

    (1) Such a mode of appeal to God occurs nowhere else in the book, and it is little in the spirit of the poem. No particular reason can be assigned why that solemn appeal should be made here, rather than in many other places.

    (2) The name "Father," though often given to God in the Scriptures, is not elsewhere given to him in this book.

    The probability is, therefore, that the word is from אבה 'âbâh - "to breathe after, to desire," and means that Elihu "desired" that Job should have a fair trial. No other similar form of the word, however, occurs The Vulgate renders it, "Pater mi, my father;" the Septuagint, "But learn, Job, no more to make reply like the foolish;" the Chaldee, צבינא - "I desire."

    May be tried - That his views may be fully canvassed and examined. He had expressed sentiments which Elihu thought should not be allowed to pass without the most careful examination into their truth and bearing. "Unto the end." In the most full and free manner; that the matter should be pursued as far as possible, so that it might be wholly understood. Literally, it means "forever" - עד־נצח ‛ad-netsach.

    Because of his answers for wicked men - Because of the views which he has expressed, which seem to favor the wicked. Elihu refers to the opinions advanced by Job that God did not punish people in this life, or did not deal with them according to their characters, which "he" interpreted as giving countenance to wickedness, or as affirming the God was not the enemy of impiety. The Vulgate renders this, "My Father, let Job be tried to the end; do not cease from the man of iniquity;" but the true meaning doubtless is, that Job had uttered sentiments which Elihu understood to favor the wicked, and he was desirous that every trial should be applied to him which would tend to correct his erroneous views.
    Book: Job