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Job 35:11

    Job 35:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Who teacheth us more than the beasts of the earth, and maketh us wiser than the fowls of heaven?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Who teaches us more than the beasts of the earth, and makes us wiser than the fowls of heaven?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Who teacheth us more than the beasts of the earth, And maketh us wiser than the birds of the heavens?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Who gives us more knowledge than the beasts of the earth, and makes us wiser than the birds of the heaven?

    Webster's Revision

    Who teacheth us more than the beasts of the earth, And maketh us wiser than the birds of the heavens?

    World English Bible

    who teaches us more than the animals of the earth, and makes us wiser than the birds of the sky?'

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Who teacheth us more than the beasts of the earth, and maketh us wiser than the fowls of heaven?

    Definitions for Job 35:11

    Fowls - Birds.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 35:11

    Who teacheth us more than the beasts - "The ox knoweth his owner, and the ass his master's crib; but Israel doth not know me, my people do not consider;" Isaiah 1:3. Beasts, bards, fowls, and in many cases pond-fishes, know and seem thankful to the hand that feeds them; while man, made much more noble than they, gifted with the greatest powers, privileged with the most important benefits, considers not the Lord, nor discerns the operation of his hand. Quadrupeds, reptiles, and fowls, have more gratitude to their masters than man has to his God.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 35:11

    Who teacheth us more than the beasts of the earth - Who is able to teach us mere than the irrational creation; that is, in regard to the nature and design of affliction. They suffer without knowing why. They are subjected to toil and hardships; endure pain, and die, without any knowledge why all this occurs, and without any rational view of the government and plans of God. It is not, or need not be so, says Elihu, when man suffers. He is intelligent. He can understand why he is afflicted. He has only to make use of his superior endowments, and apply to his Maker, and he will see so much of the reason of his doings that he will acquiesce in the wise arrangement. Perhaps there is an implied reflection here on those who suffered generally, as if they manifested no more intelligence than the brute creation. They make no use of intellectual endowments. They do not examine the nature of the divine administration, and they do not apply to God for instruction and help. If they should do so, he would teach them so that they would acquiesce and rejoice in his government and dealings. According to this view, the meaning is, that if people suffer without relief and consolation, it is to be attributed to their stupidity and unwillingness to look to God for light and aid, and not at all to his injustice.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 35:11

    35:11 Who - This is an aggravation of mens neglect of God in their misery. God hath given men, what he hath denied to beasts, wisdom to know God and themselves. Therefore they are inexcusable, for not using that wisdom, by calling on God in the time of trouble.
    Book: Job
    Topic: Animals