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Job 35:14

    Job 35:14 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Although thou sayest thou shalt not see him, yet judgment is before him; therefore trust thou in him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Although you say you shall not see him, yet judgment is before him; therefore trust you in him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    How much less when thou sayest thou beholdest him not, The cause is before him, and thou waitest for him!

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    How much less when you say that you do not see him; that the cause is before him, and you are waiting for him.

    Webster's Revision

    How much less when thou sayest thou beholdest him not, The cause is before him, and thou waitest for him!

    World English Bible

    How much less when you say you don't see him. The cause is before him, and you wait for him!

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    How much less when thou sayest thou beholdest him not, the cause is before him, and thou waitest for him!

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 35:14

    Thou sayest thou shalt not see Him - Several MSS. have "Thou shalt not see me," and the Septuagint, and one other, "Thou shalt not see us," but without the points, תשורנו, the original may be read see Him or see Us, the third person singular, or the first person plural.

    Yet judgment is before him - Rest assured that God has not forgotten either to punish or to save; therefore trust in him; choose to be a monument of his mercy, rather than of his justice.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 35:14

    Although thou sayest thou shalt not see him - This is addressed to Job, and is designed to entreat him to trust in God. Elihu seems to refer to some remark that Job had made, like that in Job 23:8, where he said that he could not come near him, nor bring his cause before him. If he went to the east, the west, thc north, or the south, he could not see him, and could get no opportunity of bringing his cause before him: see the notes at that place. Elihu here says that though it is true in fact that God is invisible, yet this ought not to be regarded as a reason why he should not confide in him. The argument of Elihu here - which is undoubtedly sound - is, that the fact that God is invisible should not be regarded as any evidence that he does not attend to the affairs of people, or that he is not worthy of our love.

    Judgment is before him - He is a God of justice, and will do that which is right.

    Therefore trust him - Though he is invisible, and though you cannot bring, your cause directly before him. The word which is used here (תחולל tchûlēl, from חול chûl) means "to turn around"; to twist; to be firm - as a rope is that is twisted; and then to wait or delay - that is, to be firm in patience. Here it may have this meaning, that Job was to be firm and unmoved, patiently waiting for the time when the now invisible God would interpose in his behalf, though he could not now see him. The idea is, that we may trust the "invisible God," or that we should patiently "wait" for him to manifest himself in our behalf, and may leave all our interests in his hands, with the feeling that they are entirely safe. It must be admitted that Job had not learned this lesson as fully as it might have been learned, and that he had evinced an undue anxiety for some public "manifestation" of the favor and friendship of God, and that he had not shown quite the willingness which he should have done to commit his interests into his hands, though he was unseen.
    Book: Job