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Job 35:3

    Job 35:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For thou saidst, What advantage will it be unto thee? and, What profit shall I have, if I be cleansed from my sin?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For you said, What advantage will it be to you? and, What profit shall I have, if I be cleansed from my sin?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    That thou sayest, What advantage will it be unto thee? And , What profit shall I have, more than if I had sinned?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    What profit is it to me, and how am I better off than if I had done wrong?

    Webster's Revision

    That thou sayest, What advantage will it be unto thee? And , What profit shall I have, more than if I had sinned?

    World English Bible

    That you ask, 'What advantage will it be to you? What profit shall I have, more than if I had sinned?'

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    That thou sayest, What advantage will it be unto thee? and, What profit shall I have, more than if I had sinned?

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 35:3

    What advantage will it be unto thee? - As if he had said to God, "My righteousness cannot profit thee, nor do I find that it is of any benefit to myself." Or perhaps Elihu makes here a general assertion, which he afterwards endeavors to exemplify: Thou hast been reasoning how it may profit thee, and thou hast said, "What profit shall I have in righteousness more than in sin?"

    Barnes' Notes on Job 35:3

    For thou saidst - Another sentiment of a similar kind which Elihu proposes to examine. He had already adverted to this sentiment of Job in Job 34:9, and examined it at some length, and had shown in reply to it that God could not be unjust, and that there was great impropriety when man presumed to arraign the justice of the Most High. He now adverts to it again in order to show that God could not be benefited or injured by the conduct of man, and that he was, therefore, under no inducement to treat him otherwise than impartially.

    What advantage will it be unto thee? - see the notes at Job 34:9. The phrase "unto thee," refers to Job himself. He had said this to himself; or to his own soul. Such a mode of expression is not uncommon in the Scriptures.

    And, What profit shall I have if I be cleansed from my sin - Margin, "or, by it" more than by my sin."" The Hebrew will admit of either of these interpretations, and the sense is not materially varied. The idea is, that as to good treatment or securing the favor of God under the arrangements of his government, a man might just as well be wicked as righteous. He would be as likely to be prosperous in the world, and to experience the tokens of the divine favor. Job had by no means advanced such a sentiment; but he had maintained that he was treated "as if" he were a sinner; that the dealings of Providence were "not" in this world in accordance with the character of people; and this was interpreted by Elihu as maintaining that there was no advantage in being righteous, or that a man might as well be a sinner. It was for such supposed sentiments as these, that Elihu and the three friends of Job charged him with giving "answers" for wicked people, or maintaining opinions which went to sustain and encourage the wicked; see Job 34:36.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 35:3

    35:3 Thou saidst - Another imputation upon God. Unto thee - Unto me; such changes of persons being frequent in the Hebrew language. What profit, and c. - God does not reward so much as I deserve. But it was not fair to charge this upon Job, which he had neither directly nor indirectly affirmed.
    Book: Job