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Job 35:5

    Job 35:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Look unto the heavens, and see; and behold the clouds which are higher than thou.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Look to the heavens, and see; and behold the clouds which are higher than you.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Look unto the heavens, and see; And behold the skies, which are higher than thou.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Let your eyes be turned to the heavens, and lifted up to see the skies; they are higher than you.

    Webster's Revision

    Look unto the heavens, and see; And behold the skies, which are higher than thou.

    World English Bible

    Look to the heavens, and see. See the skies, which are higher than you.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Look unto the heavens, and see; and behold the skies, which are higher than thou.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 35:5

    Look unto the heavens - These heavens, and their host, God has created: the bare sight of them is sufficient to show thee that God is infinitely beyond thee in wisdom and excellence.

    Behold the clouds - שחקים shechakim, the ethers, (Vulgate, aethera), from שחק shachak, to contend, fight together: the agitated or conflicting air and light; the strong agitation of these producing both light and heat. Look upon these, consider them deeply, and see and acknowledge the perfections of the Maker.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 35:5

    Look unto the heavens, and see - This is the commencement of the reply which Elihu makes to the sentiment which he had understood Job to advance, and which Eliphaz had proposed formerly to examine. The general object of the reply is, to show that God is so great that he cannot be affected with human conduct, and that he has no interest in treating people otherwise than according to character. He is so exalted that their conduct cannot reach and affect his happiness. It ought to be "presumed," therefore, since there is no motive to the contrary, that the dealings of God with people would be impartial, and that there "would" be an advantage in serving him - not because people could lay him under "obligation," but because it was right and proper that such advantage should accrue to them. To impress this view on the mind, Elihu directs Job and his friends to look to the heavens - so lofty, grand, and sublime; to reflect how much higher they are than man; and to remember that the great Creator is "above" all those heavens, and "thus" to see that he is so far cxalted that he is not dependent on man; that he cannot be affected by the righteousness or wickedness of his creatures; that his happiness is not dependent on them, and consequently that it is to bc presumed that he would act impartially, and treat all people as they deserved. There "would" be, therefore, an advantage in serving God.

    And behold the clouds - Also far above us, and seeming to float in the heavens. The sentiment here is, that one view of the astonishing display of wisdom and power above us must extinguish every feeling that he will be influenced in his dealings as people are in theirs, or that he can gain or suffer anything by the good or bad behavior of his creatures.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 35:5

    35:5 Clouds, and c. - They are far above us, and God is far above them. How much then is he out of the reach either of our sins or our services?
    Book: Job