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Job 35:8

    Job 35:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Thy wickedness may hurt a man as thou art; and thy righteousness may profit the son of man.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Your wickedness may hurt a man as you are; and your righteousness may profit the son of man.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Thy wickedness may hurt a man as thou art; And thy righteousness may profit a son of man.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Your evil-doing may have an effect on a man like yourself, or your righteousness on a son of man.

    Webster's Revision

    Thy wickedness may hurt a man as thou art; And thy righteousness may profit a son of man.

    World English Bible

    Your wickedness may hurt a man as you are, and your righteousness may profit a son of man.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Thy wickedness may hurt a man as thou art; and thy righteousness may profit a son of man.

    Definitions for Job 35:8

    Art - "Are"; second person singular.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 35:8

    Thy wickedness may hurt - It is better to translate this literally:

    To a man like thyself is thy wickedness:

    And to the son of man, thy righteousness:

    That is: -

    Thou mayest injure thyself and others by thy wickedness,

    And thou mayest benefit both by thy righteousness;

    But God thou canst neither hurt nor profit.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 35:8

    Thy wickedness may hurt a Man as thou art - That is, it may injure him, but not God. He is too far exalted above man, and too independent of man in his sources of happiness, to be affected by what he can do. The object of the whole passage Job 35:6-8 is, to show that God is independent of people, and is not governed in his dealings with them on the principles which regulate their conduct with each other. One man may be greatly benefited by the conduct of another, and may feel under obligation to reward him for it; or he maybe greatly injured in his person, property, or reputation, by another, and will endeavor to avenge himself. But nothing of this kind can happen to God. If he rewards, therefore, it must be of his grace and mercy, not because he is laid under obligation; if he inflicts chastisement, it must be because people deserve it, and not because God has been injured. In this reasoning Elihu undoubtedly refers to Job, whom he regards as having urged a "claim" to a different kind of treatment, because he supposed that he "deserved" it. The general principle of Elihu is clearly correct, that God is entirely independent of human beings; that neither our good nor evil conduct can effect his happiness, and that consequently his dealings with us are those of impartial justice.
    Book: Job