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Job 38:21

    Job 38:21 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Knowest thou it, because thou wast then born? or because the number of thy days is great?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Know you it, because you were then born? or because the number of your days is great?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Doubtless , thou knowest, for thou wast then born, And the number of thy days is great!

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    No doubt you have knowledge of it, for then you had come to birth, and the number of your days is great.

    Webster's Revision

    Doubtless , thou knowest, for thou wast then born, And the number of thy days is great!

    World English Bible

    Surely you know, for you were born then, and the number of your days is great!

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Doubtless, thou knowest, for thou wast then born, and the number of thy days is great!

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 38:21

    Knowest thou - This is another strong and biting irony, and the literal translation proves it: "Thou knowest, because thou was then born; and the number of thy days is great," or multitudinous, רבים rabbim, multitudes.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 38:21

    Knowest thou it, because thou wast then born? - This may either be a question, or it may be spoken ironically. According to the former mode of rendering it, it is the same as asking Job whether he had lived long enough to understand where the abode of light was, or whether he had an existence when it was created, and knew where its home was appointed. According to the latter mode, it is keen sarcasm. "Thou must know all this, for thou art so old. Thou hast had an opportunity of observing all this, for thou hast lived through all these changes, and observed all the works of God." This latter method of interpreting it is adopted by Umbreit, Herder, Noyes, Rosenmuller, and Wemyss. The former, however, seems much better to accord with the connection, and with the dignity and character of the speaker. It is not desirable to represent God as speaking in the language of irony and sarcasm unless the rules of interpretation imperatively demand it.
    Book: Job