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Job 4:5

    Job 4:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But now it is come upon thee, and thou faintest; it toucheth thee, and thou art troubled.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But now it is come on you, and you faint; it touches you, and you are troubled.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But now it is come unto thee, and thou faintest; It toucheth thee, and thou art troubled.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But now it has come on you and it is a weariness to you; you are touched by it and your mind is troubled.

    Webster's Revision

    But now it is come unto thee, and thou faintest; It toucheth thee, and thou art troubled.

    World English Bible

    But now it is come to you, and you faint. It touches you, and you are troubled.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But now it is come unto thee, and thou faintest; it toucheth thee, and thou art troubled.

    Definitions for Job 4:5

    Art - "Are"; second person singular.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 4:5

    But now it is come upon thee - Now it is thy turn to suffer, and give an example of the efficacy of thy own principles; but instead of this, behold, thou faintest. Either, therefore, thou didst pretend to what thou hadst not; or thou art not making a proper use of the principles which thou didst recommend to others.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 4:5

    But now it is come upon thee - That is, calamity; or, the same trial which others have had, and in which thou hast so successfully exhorted and comforted them. A similar sentiment to that which is here expressed, is found in Terence:

    Facile omnes, cum valemus, recta consilia aegrotis damus.

    And. ii. i. 9.

    It toucheth thee - That is, affliction has come to yourself. It is no longer a thing about which you can coolly sit down and reason, and on which you can deliver formal exhortations.

    And thou art troubled - Instead of evincing the calm submission which you have exhorted others to do, your mind is now disturbed and restless. You vent your complaints against the day of your birth, and you charge God with injustice. A sentiment resembling this, occurs in Terence, as quoted by Codurcus:

    Nonne id flagitium est, te aliis consilium dare,

    Foris sapere, tibi non posse te auxiliarier?

    Something similar to this not unfrequently occurs. It is an easy thing to give counsel to others, and to exhort them to be submissive in trial. It is easy to utter general maxims, and to suggest passages of Scripture on the subject of affliction, and even to impart consolation to others; but when trial comes to ourselves, we often fail to realize the power of those truths to console us. Ministers of the gospel are called officially to impart such consolations, and are enabled to do it. But when the trial comes on them, and when they ought by every solemn consideration to be able to show the power of those truths in their own case, it sometimes happens that they evince the same impatience and want of submission which they had rebuked in others; and that whatever truth and power there may have been in their instructions, they themselves little felt their force. It is often necessary that he who is appointed to comfort the afflicted, should be afflicted himself. Then he can "weep with those who weep;" and hence, it is that ministers of the gospel are called quite as much as any other class of people to pass through deep waters. Hence, too, the Lord Jesus became so pre-eminent in suffering, that he might be touched with the feelings of our infirmity, and be qualified to sympathize with us when we are tried; Hebrews 2:14, Hebrews 2:17-18; Hebrews 4:15-16. It is exceedingly important that when they whose office it is to comfort others are afflicted, they should exhibit an example of patience and submission. Then is the time to try their religion; and then they have an opportunity to convince others that the doctrines which they preach are adapted to the condition of weak and suffering man.
    Book: Job