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Job 40:19

    Job 40:19 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    He is the chief of the ways of God: he that made him can make his sword to approach unto him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    He is the chief of the ways of God: he that made him can make his sword to approach to him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    He is the chief of the ways of God: He only that made him giveth him his sword.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    He is the chief of the ways of God, made by him for his pleasure.

    Webster's Revision

    He is the chief of the ways of God: He only that made him giveth him his sword.

    World English Bible

    He is the chief of the ways of God. He who made him gives him his sword.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    He is the chief of the ways of God: he only that made him can make his sword to approach unto him.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 40:19

    He is the chief of the ways of God - The largest, strongest, and swiftest quadruped that God has formed.

    He that made him - No power of man or beast can overcome him. God alone can overcome him, and God alone could make his sword (of extinction) approach to him.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 40:19

    He is the chief of the ways of God - In size and strength. The word rendered "chief" is used in a similar sense in Numbers 24:20, "Amalek was the first of the nations;" that is, one of the most powerful and mighty of the nations.

    He that made him can make his sword approach unto him - According to this translation, the sense is, that God had power over him, notwithstanding his great strength and size, and could take his life when he pleased. Yet this, though it would be a correct sentiment, does not seem to be that which the connection demands. That would seem to require some allusion to the strength of the animal; and accordingly, the translation suggested by Bochart, and adopted substantially by Rosenmuller, Umbreit, Noyes, Schultens, Prof. Lee, and others, is to be preferred - "He that made him furnished him with a sword." The allusion then would be to his strong, sharp teeth, hearing a resemblance to a sword, and designed either for defense or for the purpose of cutting the long grass on which it fed when on the land. The propriety of this interpretation may be seen vindicated at length in Bochart, "Hieroz." P. ii. Lib. v. c. xv. pp. 766, 762. The ἅρπη harpē, i. e. the sickle or scythe, was ascribed to the hippopotamus by some of the Greek writers. Thus, Nicander, "Theriacon," verse 566:

    Η ἵππον, τὸν Νεῖλος ύπερ Σάιν αἰθαλοεσσαν

    Βόσκει, ἀρούρησιν δὲ κακὴν ἐπιβάλλεται

    ἍΡΠΗΝ.

    Ee hippon, ton Neilos huper Sain aithaloessan

    Boskei, arourēsin de kakēn epiballetai.

    Harpēn

    On this passage the Scholiast remarks, "The ἅρπη harpē, means a sickle, and the teeth of the hippopotamus are so called - teaching that this animal consumes (τρώγει trōgei) the harvest." See Bochart also for other examples. A slight inspection of the "cut" will show with what propriety it is said of the Creator of the hippopotamus, that he had armed him with a sickle, or sword.
    Book: Job