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Job 41:18

    Job 41:18 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    By his neesings a light doth shine, and his eyes are like the eyelids of the morning.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    By his neesings a light does shine, and his eyes are like the eyelids of the morning.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    His sneezings flash forth light, And his eyes are like the eyelids of the morning.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    His sneezings give out flames, and his eyes are like the eyes of the dawn.

    Webster's Revision

    His sneezings flash forth light, And his eyes are like the eyelids of the morning.

    World English Bible

    His sneezing flashes out light. His eyes are like the eyelids of the morning.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    His neesings flash forth light, and his eyes are like the eyelids of the morning.

    Definitions for Job 41:18

    Doth - To do; to produce; make.
    Neesings - Sneezings.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 41:18

    By his neesings a light doth shine - It is very likely that this may be taken literally. When he spurts up the water out of his nostrils, the drops form a sort of iris or rainbow. We have seen this effect produced when, in certain situations and state of the atmosphere, water was thrown up forcibly, so as to be broken into small drops, which has occasioned an appearance like the rainbow.

    The eyelids of the morning - It is said that, under the water, the eyes of the crocodile are exceedingly dull; but when he lifts his head above water they sparkle with the greatest vivacity. Hence the Egyptians, in their hieroglyphics, made the eyes of the crocodile the emblem of the morning. Ανατολην λεγοντες δυο οφθαλμους κροκοδειλου ζωογραφουσι. - Horapp. Egypt. Ieroglyph., lib. i., c. 65. This is a most remarkable circumstance, casts light on ancient history, and shows the rigid correctness of the picture drawn above. The same figure is employed by the Greek poets.

    Χρυσεας ἡμερας βλεφαρον.

    "The eyelid of the golden day."

    Soph. Antig. ver. 103.

    Νυκτος αφεγγες βλεφαρον.

    "The darksome eyelid of the night."

    Eurip. Phaeniss. ver. 553.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 41:18

    By his neesings a light doth shine - The word rendered "neesings" means properly sneezing, and the literal sense here would be, "His sneezings, light shines." Coverdale renders it, "His nesinge is like a glisteringe fyre." Bochart says that the meaning is, "that when the crocodile sneezes, the breath is driven through the nostrils with such force that it seems to scintillate, or emit fire." Probably the meaning is, that when the animal emits a sudden sound, like sneezing, the fire seems to flash from the eye. There is some quick and rapid motion of the eyes, which in the rays of the sun seem to flash fire. The sneezing of the crocodile is mentioned by Aristotle. Prof. Lee. Amphibious animals, the longer they hold their breath under water, respire so much the more violently when they emerge, and the breath is expelled suddenly and with violence. Schultens. This is the action here referred to - the strong effort of the animal to recover breath when he rises to the surface, and when in the effort the eyes seem to scintillate, or emit light.

    And his eyes are like the eyelids of the morning - The "eyelids of the morning" is a beautiful poetic phrase quite common in Hebrew poetry. The eyes of the crocodile are small, but they are remarkable. When he lifts his head above water, his staring eyes are the first things that strike the beholder, and may then with great beauty be compared with the morning light. There is a remarkable coincidence here, in the fact that when the Egyptians would represent the morning by a hieroglyphic, they painted a crocodile's eye. The reason assigned for this was, that before the whole body of the animal appeared, the eyes seemed to rise from the deep; see Bochart on the passage, "Hierez.," and also Herapollo, "Hieroglyph." i. c. 65.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 41:18

    41:18 Sneesings - This the crocodile is said frequently to do. Eyes - To which they seem very fitly compared, because the eyes of the crocodile are dull and dark under the water, but as soon as they appear above water, cast a bright and clear light; like the morning light, suddenly breaking forth after the dark night.
    Book: Job