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Job 41:19

    Job 41:19 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Out of his mouth go burning lamps, and sparks of fire leap out.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Out of his mouth go burning lamps, and sparks of fire leap out.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Out of his mouth go burning torches, And sparks of fire leap forth.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Out of his mouth go burning lights, and flames of fire are jumping up.

    Webster's Revision

    Out of his mouth go burning torches, And sparks of fire leap forth.

    World English Bible

    Out of his mouth go burning torches. Sparks of fire leap forth.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Out of his mouth go burning torches, and sparks of fire leap forth.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 41:19

    Out of his mouth go burning lamps - Dr. Young, in his paraphrase, has a sensible note on this passage: - "This is nearer the truth than at first view may be imagined. The crocodile, according to naturalists, lying long under water, and being there forced to hold its breath, when it emerges, the breath long repressed is hot, and bursts out so violently, that it resembles fire and smoke. The horse does not repress his breath by any means so long, neither is he so fierce and animated; yet the most correct of poets ventures to use the same metaphor concerning him, volvit sub naribus ignem. By this I would caution against a false opinion of the boldness of Eastern metaphors, from passages ill understood."

    Barnes' Notes on Job 41:19

    Out of his mouth go burning lamps - The word "lamps" here is probably used to denote torches, or fire-brands. The animal is here described as in pursuit of his prey on land; and the description is exceedingly graphic and powerful. His mouth is then open; his jaws are distended; his breath is thrown out with great violence; his blood is inflamed, and the animal seems to vomit forth flames. The description is of course to be regarded as figurative. It is such as one would be likely to give who should see a fierce animal pressing on in pursuit of its prey.

    And sparks of fire leap out - There is an appearance like sparks of fire. The animal, with an open throat highly inflamed, seems to breathe forth flames. The figure is a common one applied to a war-horse. Thus, Ovid:

    "From their full racks the generous steeds retire,

    Dropping ambrosial foam and snorting fire."

    Dr. Good

    The same thing is remarked by Achilles Tatius, of the hippopotamus, "With open nostrils, and breathing smoke like fire (πυρώδη καπνόν purōdē kapnon) as from a fountain of fire." And in Eustathius it is said, "They have an open nostril, breathing forth smoke like fire from a furnace " - πυρώδη καπνόν, ὠς ἐκ καμίνου πνέοντα purōdē kapnon, hōs ek kaminou pneonta. See Bochart.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 41:19

    41:19 Lamps - This also better agrees with the crocodile, which breathes like the river - horse, of which ancient authors affirm, that his nostrils are very large, and he breathes forth a fiery smoke like that of a furnace.
    Book: Job