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Job 41:26

    Job 41:26 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The sword of him that layeth at him cannot hold: the spear, the dart, nor the habergeon.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The sword of him that lays at him cannot hold: the spear, the dart, nor the habergeon.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    If one lay at him with the sword, it cannot avail; Nor the spear, the dart, nor the pointed shaft.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The sword may come near him but is not able to go through him; the spear, or the arrow, or the sharp-pointed iron.

    Webster's Revision

    If one lay at him with the sword, it cannot avail; Nor the spear, the dart, nor the pointed shaft.

    World English Bible

    If one attacks him with the sword, it can't prevail; nor the spear, the dart, nor the pointed shaft.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    If one lay at him with the sword, it cannot avail; nor the spear, the dart, nor the pointed shaft.

    Definitions for Job 41:26

    Habergeon - A coat of armor.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 41:26

    Habergeon - The hauberk, the Norman armor for the head, neck, and breast, formed of rings. See on Nehemiah 4:16 (note).

    Barnes' Notes on Job 41:26

    The sword of him that layeth at him - The word "sword" here (חרב chereb) means undoubtedly "harpoon," or a sharp instrument by which an attempt is made to pierce the skin of the monster.

    Cannot hold - That is, in the hard skin. It does not penetrate it.

    The spear, the dart - These were doubtless often used in the attempt to take the animal. The meaning is, that "they" would not hold or stick to the animal. They flew off when hurled at him.

    Nor the habergeon - Margin, "breastplate." Noyes, "javelin." Prof. Lee, "lance." Vulgate, "thorax, breastplate." So the Septuagint, θώρακα thōraka. The word used here (שׁריה shiryâh), the same as שׁריון shiryôn 1 Samuel 17:5, 1 Samuel 17:38; Nehemiah 4:16; 2 Chronicles 26:14, means properly a "coat of mail," and is so called from its shining - from שׁרה shârâh, "to shine." It is not used in the sense of spear or javelin elsewhere, though perhaps it may have that meaning here - denoting a "bright" or "shining" weapon. This agrees best with the connection.
    Book: Job