Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Job 41:7

    Job 41:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Canst thou fill his skin with barbed irons? or his head with fish spears?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Can you fill his skin with barbed irons? or his head with fish spears?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Canst thou fill his skin with barbed irons, Or his head with fish-spears?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Will you put sharp-pointed irons into his skin, or fish-spears into his head?

    Webster's Revision

    Canst thou fill his skin with barbed irons, Or his head with fish-spears?

    World English Bible

    Can you fill his skin with barbed irons, or his head with fish spears?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Canst thou fill his skin with barbed irons, or his head with fish spears?

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 41:7

    Canst thou fill his skin with barbed irons? - This refers to some kind of harpoon work, similar to that employed in taking whales, and which they might use for some other kinds of animals; for the skin of the crocodile could not be pierced. Herrera says that he saw a crocodile defend itself against thirty men; and that they fired six balls at it without being able to wound it. It can only be wounded under his belly.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 41:7

    Canst thou fill his skin with barbed irons? - Referring to its thickness and impenetrability. A common method of taking fish is by the spear; but it is here said that the leviathan could not be caught in this manner. The common method of taking the crocodile now is by shooting him; see the notes at Job 41:1. Nothing is more remarkable in the crocodile than the thick and impenetrable skin with which it is covered; and the description here will agree better with this animal than with any other.

    Or his head with fish spears - The word here rendered "fish-spears" (צלצל tselâtsal) means properly a "tinkling, clanging," as of metal or arms, and then any tinkling instrument. Here it evidently refers to some metal spear, or harpoon, and the name was given to the instrument on account of its clanging noise. The Septuagint renders this strangely, referring it to the "Phenicians," or merchants mentioned in the previous verse - "With their whole fleet they could not carry the first skin of his tail, nor his head in their fishing-barks."
    Book: Job