Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Job 5:6

    Job 5:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Although affliction cometh not forth of the dust, neither doth trouble spring out of the ground;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Although affliction comes not forth of the dust, neither does trouble spring out of the ground;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For affliction cometh not forth from the dust, Neither doth trouble spring out of the ground;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For evil does not come out of the dust, or trouble out of the earth;

    Webster's Revision

    For affliction cometh not forth from the dust, Neither doth trouble spring out of the ground;

    World English Bible

    For affliction doesn't come forth from the dust, neither does trouble spring out of the ground;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For affliction cometh not forth of the dust, neither doth trouble spring out of the ground;

    Definitions for Job 5:6

    Doth - To do; to produce; make.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 5:6

    Affliction cometh not forth of the dust - If there were not an adequate cause, thou couldst not be so grievously afflicted.

    Spring out of the ground - It is not from mere natural causes that affliction and trouble come; God's justice inflicts them upon offending man.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 5:6

    Although affliction cometh not forth of the dust - Margin, "or iniquity." The marginal reading here has been inserted from the different meanings attached to the Hebrew word. That word (און 'âven) properly means nothingness, or vanity; then nothingness as to worth, unworthiness, wickedness, iniquity; and then the consequences of iniquity - adversity, calamity, affliction; Psalm 55:4; Proverbs 22:8; Psalm 90:10; Job 15:35. The Septuagint renders it κόπος kopos, "labor," or "trouble." The Vulgate, Nihil in terra, sine causa - "there is nothing on the earth without a cause." The general sense is plain. It is, that afflictions are not to be ascribed to chance, or that they are not without intelligent design. They do not come up like thistles, brambles, and thorns, from the unconscious earth. They have a cause. They are under the direction of God. The object of Eliphaz in the statement is, to show to Job that it was improper to complain, and that he should commit his cause to a God of infinite power and wisdom; Job 5:8 ff. Afflictions, Eliphaz says, could not be avoided. Man was born unto them. He ought to expect them, and when they come, they should be submitted to as ordered by an intelligent, wise, and good Being. This is one true ground of consolation in afflictions. They do not come from the unconscious earth: they do not spring up of themselves. Though it is true that man is born to them, and must expect them, yet it is also true that they are ordered in infinite wisdom, and that they always have a design.

    Neither doth trouble spring out of the ground - The Septuagint renders this, "Nor will affliction spring up from the mountains."

    Wesley's Notes on Job 5:6

    5:6 The dust - It springs not up by merely natural causes, as herbs grow out of the earth: but from God. Eliphaz here begins to change his voice, as if he would atone for the hard words he had spoken.
    Book: Job