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Job 6:5

    Job 6:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Doth the wild ass bray when he hath grass? or loweth the ox over his fodder?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Does the wild ass bray when he has grass? or lows the ox over his fodder?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Doth the wild ass bray when he hath grass? Or loweth the ox over his fodder?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Does the ass of the fields give out his voice when he has grass? or does the ox make sounds over his food?

    Webster's Revision

    Doth the wild ass bray when he hath grass? Or loweth the ox over his fodder?

    World English Bible

    Does the wild donkey bray when he has grass? Or does the ox low over his fodder?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Doth the wild ass bray when he hath grass? or loweth the ox over his fodder?

    Definitions for Job 6:5

    Bray - To crush as in a mortar.
    Doth - To do; to produce; make.
    Loweth - To moo (cow noise).

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 6:5

    Doth the wild ass - פרא pere, translated onager, by the Vulgate, from the ονος αγριος of the Septuagint, which we properly enough, translate wild ass. It is the same with the tame ass; only in a wild state it grows to a larger size, is stronger, and more fleet. The meaning of Job appears to be this: You condemn me for complaining; do I complain without a cause? The wild ass will not bray, and the ox will not low, unless in want. If they have plenty of provender, they are silent. Were I at rest, at ease, and happy, I would not complain.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 6:5

    Doth the wild ass bray when he hath grass? - On the habits of the wild ass, see the notes at Job 11:12. The meaning of Job here is, that he did not complain without reason; and this he illustrates by the fact that the wild animal that had a plentiful supply of food would be gentle and calm, and that when its bray was heard it was proof that it was suffering. So Job says that there was a reason for his complaining. He was suffering; and perhaps he means that his complaint was just as natural, and just as innocent, as the braying of the ass for its food. He should have remembered however, that he was endowed with reason, and that he was bound to evince a different spirit from the brute creation.

    Or loweth the ox over his fodder? - That is, the ox is satisfied and uncomplaining when his needs are supplied. The fact that he lows is proof that he is in distress, or there is a reason for it. So Job says that his complaints were proof that he was in distress, and that there was a reason for his language of complaint.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 6:5

    6:5 Doth, and c. - Even the brute beasts, when they have convenient food, are quiet and contented. So it is no wonder that you complain not, who live in ease and prosperity, any more than I did, when I wanted nothing.
    Book: Job