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Job 6:8

    Job 6:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Oh that I might have my request; and that God would grant me the thing that I long for!

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Oh that I might have my request; and that God would grant me the thing that I long for!

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Oh that I might have my request; And that God would grant me the thing that I long for!

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    If only I might have an answer to my prayer, and God would give me my desire!

    Webster's Revision

    Oh that I might have my request; And that God would grant me the thing that I long for!

    World English Bible

    "Oh that I might have my request, that God would grant the thing that I long for,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Oh that I might have my request; and that God would grant me the thing that I long for.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 6:8

    O that I might have - As Job had no hope that he should ever be redeemed from his present helpless state, he earnestly begs God to shorten it by taking away his life.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 6:8

    Oh that I might have my request - To wit, death. This he desired as the end of his sorrows, either that he might be freed from them, or that he might be admitted to a happy world - or both.

    Would grant me the thing that I long for - Margin, "My expectation." That is, death. He expected it; he looked out for it; he was impatient that the hour should come. This state of feeling is not uncommon - where sorrows become so accumulated and intense that a man desires to die. It is no evidence, however, of a preparation for death. The wicked are more frequently in this state than the righteous. They are overwhelmed with pain; they see no hope of deliverance from it and they impatiently wish that the end had come. They are stupid about the future world, and either suppose that the grave is the end of their being, or that in some undefinable way they will be made happy hereafter. The righteous, on the other hand, are willing to wait until God shall be pleased to release them, feeling that He has some good purpose in all that they endure, and that they do not suffer one pang too much. Such sometimes were Job's feelings; but here, as in some other instances, no one can doubt that he was betrayed into unjustifiable impatience under his sorrows, and that he expressed an improper wish to die.
    Book: Job