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Job 9:31

    Job 9:31 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Yet shalt thou plunge me in the ditch, and mine own clothes shall abhor me.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Yet shall you plunge me in the ditch, and my own clothes shall abhor me.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Yet wilt thou plunge me in the ditch, And mine own clothes shall abhor me.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then you will have me pushed into the dust, so that I will seem disgusting to my very clothing.

    Webster's Revision

    Yet wilt thou plunge me in the ditch, And mine own clothes shall abhor me.

    World English Bible

    yet you will plunge me in the ditch. My own clothes shall abhor me.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Yet wilt thou plunge me in the ditch, and mine own clothes shall abhor me.

    Definitions for Job 9:31

    Abhor - Despise; spurn; regard with horror.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 9:31

    And mine own clothes shall abhor me - Such is thine infinite purity, when put in opposition to the purity of man, that it will bear no comparison. Searched and tried by the eye of God, I should be found as a leper, so that my own clothes would dread to touch me, for fear of being infected by my corruption. This is a strong and bold figure; and is derived from the corrupted state of his body, which his clothes dreaded to touch, because of the contagious nature of his disorder.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 9:31

    Yet shalt thou plunge me in the ditch - God would treat me as if he should throw me into the gutter, and as if I were wholly defiled and polluted. The meaning is, God would not admit the proofs which I should adduce of my innocence, but would overwhelm me with the demonstrations of my guilt. I doubt not that Job urged this with some degree of impatience, and with some improper feelings. He felt, evidently, that God was so great and powerful, that it was vain to contend with him. But it is true in a higher and more important sense than he seems to have understood it. After all the efforts which we can make to justify, vindicate, or purify ourselves, it is in the power of God to overwhelm us with the consciousness of guilt. He has access to the heart. He can show us our past sins. He can recall what we have forgotten, and overwhelm us with the remembrance of our deep depravity. It is in vain, therefore, for any man to attempt to justify himself before God. After the most labored argument to prove his own innocence, after all the confidence which he can repose in his own morality and his own righteousness, still God can with infinite ease overwhelm him with the consciousness of guilt. How many people that were once relying on their own morality for their salvation, have been bowed down with a consciousness of guilt in a revival of religion! How many who halve been trusting to their own righteousness have been overwhelmed with deep and awful conviction, when they have been brought to lie on a bed of death! Let no man, therefore, rely on his own righteousness, when God accuses him with being a sinner. Let no one trust to his own morality for salvation - for soon it will all be seen to be insufficient, and the soul must appear covered over with the consciousness of guilt at the awful bar of God.

    And mine own clothes shall abhor me - Margin, Make me to be abhorred. That is, they shall be filthy and offensive - like one who has been rolled in the mire. God has power to make me seem defiled and loathsome, notwithstanding all my efforts to cleanse myself.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 9:31

    9:31 Yet - God would prove him to be a most guilty creature, notwithstanding all his purity before men. Abhor - I shall be so filthy, that my own clothes, if they had any sense in them, would abhor to touch me.
    Book: Job