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John 11:16

    John 11:16 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Then said Thomas, which is called Didymus, unto his fellowdisciples, Let us also go, that we may die with him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Then said Thomas, which is called Didymus, to his fellow disciples, Let us also go, that we may die with him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Thomas therefore, who is called Didymus, said unto his fellow-disciples, Let us also go, that we may die with him.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then Thomas, who was named Didymus, said to the other disciples, Let us go so that we may be with him in death.

    Webster's Revision

    Thomas therefore, who is called Didymus, said unto his fellow-disciples, Let us also go, that we may die with him.

    World English Bible

    Thomas therefore, who is called Didymus, said to his fellow disciples, "Let's go also, that we may die with him."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Thomas therefore, who is called Didymus, said unto his fellow-disciples, Let us also go, that we may die with him.

    Definitions for John 11:16

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on John 11:16

    Thomas, which is called Didymus - Thomas, or תאום Thaom, was his Hebrew name, and signifies a twin - one who had a brother or a sister born with him at the same time: Didymus, Διδυμος, is a literal translation of the Hebrew word into Greek. In Genesis 25:24, Esau and Jacob are called תומים thomeem, twins; Septuag. διδυμα, from διδυμος, a twin - from the Anglo-Saxon, to double.

    Let us also go, that we may die with him - That is, "Seeing we cannot dissuade our Lord from going, and his death is likely to be the inevitable consequence, let us give him the fullest proof we can of our love, by going and suffering death with him." Some think Thomas spoke these words peevishly, and that they should be translated thus, Must we also go, and expose ourselves to destruction with him? which is as much as to say: "If he will obstinately go and risk his life in so imminent a danger, let us act with more prudence and caution." But I think the first sense is to be preferred. When a matter is spoken which concerns the moral character of a person, and which may be understood in a good and a bad sense, that sense which is most favorable to the person should certainly be adopted. This is taking things by the best handle, and both justice and mercy require it. The conduct of most men widely differs from this: of such an old proverb says, "They feed like the flies - pass over all a man's whole parts, to light upon his sores."

    Barnes' Notes on John 11:16

    Thomas, which is called Didymus - These names express the same thing. One is Hebrew and the other Greek. The name means a twin.

    Die with him - It has been much doubted by critics whether the word him refers to Lazarus or to Jesus. They who refer it to Lazarus suppose this to be the meaning: "Let us go and die, for what have we to hope for if Jesus returns into Judea? Lately they attempted to stone him, and now they will put him to death, and we also, like Lazarus, shall be dead." This expression, is supposed to be added by John to show the slowness with which Thomas believed, and his readiness to doubt without the fullest evidence. See John 20:25. Others suppose, probably more correctly, that it refers to Jesus: "He is about to throw himself into danger. The Jews lately sought his life, and will again. They will put him to death. But let us not forsake him. Let us attend him and die with him." It may be remarked that this, not less than the other mode of interpretation, expresses the doubts of Thomas about the miracle which Jesus was about to work.

    Wesley's Notes on John 11:16

    11:16 Thomas in Hebrew, as Didymus in Greek, signifies a twin. With him - With Jesus, whom he supposed the Jews would kill. It seems to be the language of despair.