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John 13:14

    John 13:14 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    If I then, your Lord and Master, have washed your feet; ye also ought to wash one another's feet.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    If I then, your Lord and Master, have washed your feet; you also ought to wash one another's feet.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    If I then, the Lord and the Teacher, have washed your feet, ye also ought to wash one another's feet.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    If then I, the Lord and the Master, have made your feet clean, it is right for you to make one another's feet clean.

    Webster's Revision

    If I then, the Lord and the Teacher, have washed your feet, ye also ought to wash one another's feet.

    World English Bible

    If I then, the Lord and the Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another's feet.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    If I then, the Lord and the Master, have washed your feet, ye also ought to wash one another's feet.

    Definitions for John 13:14

    Ought - Any one; any thing.

    Clarke's Commentary on John 13:14

    Ye also ought to wash one another feet - That is, ye should be ready, after my example, to condescend to all the weakness of your brethren; to be willing to do the meanest offices for them, and to prefer the least of them in honor to yourselves.

    Barnes' Notes on John 13:14

    Ye also ought to wash ... - Some have understood this literally as instituting a religious rite which we ought to observe; but this was evidently not the design; because:

    1. There is no evidence that Jesus intended it as a religious observance, like the Lord's Supper or the ordinance of baptism.

    2. It was not observed by the apostles or the primitive Christians as a religious rite.

    3. It was a rite of hospitality among the Jews, a common, well-known thing, and performed by servants.

    4. It is the manifest design of Jesus here to inculcate a lesson of humility; to teach them by his example that they ought to condescend to the most humble offices for the benefit of others. They ought not to be proud, and vain, and unwilling to occupy a low place, but to regard themselves as the servants of each other, and as willing to befriend each other in every way. And especially as they were to be founders of the church, and to be greatly honored, he took this occasion of warning them against the dangers of ambition, and of teaching them, by an example that they could not forget, the duty of humility.