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John 19:28

    John 19:28 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    After this, Jesus knowing that all things were now accomplished, that the scripture might be fulfilled, saith, I thirst.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    After this, Jesus knowing that all things were now accomplished, that the scripture might be fulfilled, said, I thirst.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    After this Jesus, knowing that all things are now finished, that the scripture might be accomplished, saith, I thirst.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    After this, being conscious that all things had now been done so that the Writings might come true, Jesus said, Give me water.

    Webster's Revision

    After this Jesus, knowing that all things are now finished, that the scripture might be accomplished, saith, I thirst.

    World English Bible

    After this, Jesus, seeing that all things were now finished, that the Scripture might be fulfilled, said, "I am thirsty."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    After this Jesus, knowing that all things are now finished, that the scripture might be accomplished, saith, I thirst.

    Definitions for John 19:28

    Scripture - That which is written; book; letter.

    Clarke's Commentary on John 19:28

    I thirst - The scripture that referred to his drinking the vinegar is Psalm 69:21. The fatigue which he had undergone, the grief he had felt, the heat of the day, and the loss of blood, were the natural causes of this thirst. This he would have borne without complaint; but he wished to give them the fullest proof of his being the Messiah, by distinctly marking how every thing relative to the Messiah, which had been written in the prophets, had its complete fulfillment in him.

    Barnes' Notes on John 19:28

    See the notes at Matthew 27:46-50.

    That the scripture might be fulfilled, saith, I thirst - See Psalm 69:21. Thirst was one of the most distressing circumstances attending the crucifixion. The wounds were highly inflamed, and a raging fever was caused, usually, by the sufferings on the cross, and this was accompanied by insupportable thirst. See the notes at Matthew 27:35. A Mameluke, or Turkish officer, was crucified, it is said in an Arabic manuscript recently translated, on the banks of the Barada River, under the castle of Damascus. He was nailed to the cross on Friday, and remained until Sunday noon, when he died. After giving an account of the crucifixion, the narrator proceeds: "I have heard this from one who witnessed it; and he thus remained until he died, patient and silent, without wailing, but looking around him to the right and the left, upon the people. But he begged for water, and none was given him; and the hearts of the people were melted with compassion for him, and with pity on one of God's creatures, who, yet a boy, was suffering under so grievous a trial. In the meantime the water was flowing around him, and he gazed upon it, and longed for one drop of it; and he complained of thirst all the first day, after which he was silent, for God gave him strength" - Wiseman's Lectures, pp. 164, 165, ed.