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John 4:53

    John 4:53 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    So the father knew that it was at the same hour, in the which Jesus said unto him, Thy son liveth: and himself believed, and his whole house.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    So the father knew that it was at the same hour, in the which Jesus said to him, Your son lives: and himself believed, and his whole house.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    So the father knew that it was at that hour in which Jesus said unto him, Thy son liveth: and himself believed, and his whole house.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    It was clear then to the father that this was the very time at which Jesus said to him, Your son is living. And he had faith in Jesus, he and all his family.

    Webster's Revision

    So the father knew that it was at that hour in which Jesus said unto him, Thy son liveth: and himself believed, and his whole house.

    World English Bible

    So the father knew that it was at that hour in which Jesus said to him, "Your son lives." He believed, as did his whole house.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    So the father knew that it was at that hour in which Jesus said unto him, Thy son liveth: and himself believed, and his whole house.

    Clarke's Commentary on John 4:53

    So the father knew - He had the fullest proof that his son's cure was supernatural, and that it was wrought by the Lord Jesus.

    Himself believed, and his whole house - He and his whole family became true converts to the doctrine of the manifested Messiah. The whole family, impressed with the great kindness of God in sending health to the child, were the more easily led to believe in the Lord Jesus. The sickness of the child became the mean of salvation to all the household. They, no doubt, thought at first that God was dealing hardly with them, when threatening to remove the child; but now they see that in very faithfulness God had afflicted them. Let us learn never to murmur against God, or think that he does not act kindly towards us. His wisdom cannot permit him to err; his goodness will not suffer him to do any thing to his creatures but what may be subservient to their best interests. By providential occurrences, apparently the most adverse, he may be securing our eternal salvation.

    There is an account in Beracoth, fol. 34, very similar to this of the evangelist, and very possibly stolen from this holy source. "When the son of Rab. Gamaliel fell sick, he sent two of his disciples to R. Chanina, that he would pray to God for him. When he had seen them, he went on the roof of his house and prayed for him. He then came down and said to them, His fever has departed from him. They said unto him, Art thou a prophet? He answered, I am neither a prophet, nor the son of a prophet; but when I can recite my prayers readily, I know I shall be heard. They then wrote down the hour; and, when they returned to R. Gamaliel, he said to them, Ye have fulfilled your ministry - in respect to my son, all is complete. In that hour the fever (חמה chomah, ὁ πυρετος) left him, and he desired water to drink." Schoettgen very properly remarks, Ovum ovo non magis simile est, atque haec fabula narrationi evangelicae. "One egg is not more like to another, than this fable to the evangelical narration."

    Barnes' Notes on John 4:53

    Himself believed - This miracle removed all his doubts, and he became a real disciple and friend of Jesus.

    His whole house - His whole family. We may learn from this,

    1. That sickness or any deep affliction is often the means of great good. Here the sickness of the son resulted in the faith of all the family. God often takes away earthly blessings that he may impart rich spiritual mercies.

    2. The father of a family may be the means of the salvation of his children. Here the effort of a parent resulted in their conversion to Christ.

    3. There is great beauty and propriety when sickness thus results in piety. For that it is sent. God does not willingly grieve or afflict the children of men; and when afflictions thus terminate, it will be cause of eternal joy, of ceaseless praise.

    4. There is a special charm when piety thus comes into the families of the rich. and the noble. It is so unusual: their example and influence go so far; it overcomes so many temptations, and affords opportunities of doing so much good, that there is no wonder that the evangelist selected this instance as one of the effects of the power and of the preaching of the Lord Jesus Christ.