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Joshua 12:22

    Joshua 12:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The king of Kedesh, one; the king of Jokneam of Carmel, one;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The king of Kedesh, one; the king of Jokneam of Carmel, one;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    the king of Kedesh, one; the king of Jokneam in Carmel, one;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The king of Kedesh, one; the king of Jokneam in Carmel, one;

    Webster's Revision

    the king of Kedesh, one; the king of Jokneam in Carmel, one;

    World English Bible

    the king of Kedesh, one; the king of Jokneam in Carmel, one;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    the king of Kedesh, one; the king of Jokneam in Carmel, one;

    Clarke's Commentary on Joshua 12:22

    Kedesh - There was a city of this name in the tribe of Naphtali, Joshua 19:37. It was given to the Levites, and was one of the cities of refuge, Joshua 20:7.

    Jokneam of Carmel - This city is said to have been at the foot of Mount Carmel, near the river Belus, in the tribe of Zebulun, Joshua 19:11. It was given to the Levites, Joshua 21:34.

    Barnes' Notes on Joshua 12:22

    Kedesh - i. e. Kedesh Naphtali, a city of refuge, a Levitical city, and the home of Barak Judges 9:6.

    Jokneam - A Levitical city in the territory of Zebulon Joshua 19:11; perhaps the modern "Kaimon". "Tell Kaimon" is a conspicuous and important position, commanding the main pass across the ridge of Carmel from Phoenicia to Egypt. This famous mountain range (about 15 miles long) no doubt received the name Carmel (the word means "a fruitful field" as opposed to "wilderness") as descriptive of its character; and thus the name became an emblem of beauty and luxuriance (Isaiah 35:2; Sol 7:5, etc.). Its highest part, about 4 miles from Tell Kaimon, is nearly 1,750 feet above the sea. Its modern name, "Jebel Mar Elias", preserves still that association with the great deeds of Elijah, from which Carmel derives its chief Biblical interest. Mount Carmel was probably, like Lebanon, from very ancient Canaanite times, regarded as especially sacred; and since the altar of the Lord repaired by Elijah 1 Kings 18:30 was an old one which had been broken down, Carmel was probably no less esteemed by the Israelites also. In later times the caves which abound toward the western bluffs of the range have been frequented by Christian, Jewish, and Mussulman anchorites. The order of Carmelite or barefooted friars took its rise from the convent founded by Louis, which still crowns the western headland.