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Joshua 12:24

    Joshua 12:24 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The king of Tirzah, one: all the kings thirty and one.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The king of Tirzah, one: all the kings thirty and one.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    the king of Tirzah, one: all the kings thirty and one.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The king of Tirzah, one; all the kings together were thirty-one.

    Webster's Revision

    the king of Tirzah, one: all the kings thirty and one.

    World English Bible

    the king of Tirzah, one: all the kings thirty-one.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    the king of Tirzah, one: all the kings thirty and one.

    Clarke's Commentary on Joshua 12:24

    King of Tirzah - This city appears to have been for a long time the capital of the kingdom of Israel, and the residence of its kings. See 1 Kings 14:17; 1 Kings 15:21, 1 Kings 15:33. Its situation cannot be exactly ascertained; but it is supposed to have been situated on a mountain about three leagues south of Samaria.

    All the kings thirty and one - The Septuagint say εικοσι εννεα, twenty-nine, and yet set down but twenty-eight, as they confound or omit the kings of Beth-el, Lasharon, and Madon.

    So many kings in so small a territory, shows that their kingdoms must have been very small indeed. The kings of Beth-el and Ai had but about 12,000 subjects in the whole; but in ancient times all kings had very small territories. Every village or town had its chief; and this chief was independent of his neighbors, and exercised regal power in his own district. In reading all ancient histories, as well as the Bible, this circumstance must be kept constantly in view; for we ought to consider that in those times both kings and kingdoms were but a faint resemblance of those now.

    Great Britain, in ancient times, was divided into many kingdoms: in the time of the Saxons it was divided into seven, hence called the Saxon heptarchy. But when Julius Caesar first entered this island, he found four kings in Kent alone; Cingetorix, Carnilius, Taximagulus, and Segonax. Hence we need not wonder at the numbers we read of in the land of Canaan. Ancient Gaul was thus divided; and the great number of sovereign princes, secular bishops, landgraves, dukes, etc., etc., in Germany, are the modern remains of those ancient divisions.

    Barnes' Notes on Joshua 12:24

    Tirzah - This place, the capital of Jeroboam and his successors until the clays of Omri (1 Kings 14:17; 1 Kings 15:21, etc.), is identified by some with "Tulluzah", a town 3 miles northeast of Nablous, (by others with Teiasir).

    Wesley's Notes on Joshua 12:24

    12:24 Thirty one - Each being king only of one city or small province belonging to it, which was by the wise and singular providence of God, that they might be more easily conquered. But what a fruitful land must Canaan then be, which could subsist so many kingdoms! And yet at this day it is one of the most barren and despicable countries in the world. Such is the effect of the curse it lies under, since its inhabitants rejected the Lord of glory!