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Joshua 7:6

    Joshua 7:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Joshua rent his clothes, and fell to the earth upon his face before the ark of the LORD until the eventide, he and the elders of Israel, and put dust upon their heads.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Joshua rent his clothes, and fell to the earth on his face before the ark of the LORD until the eventide, he and the elders of Israel, and put dust on their heads.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Joshua rent his clothes, and fell to the earth upon his face before the ark of Jehovah until the evening, he and the elders of Israel; and they put dust upon their heads.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then Joshua, in great grief, went down on the earth before the ark of the Lord till the evening, and all the chiefs of Israel with him, and they put dust on their heads.

    Webster's Revision

    And Joshua rent his clothes, and fell to the earth upon his face before the ark of Jehovah until the evening, he and the elders of Israel; and they put dust upon their heads.

    World English Bible

    Joshua tore his clothes, and fell to the earth on his face before the ark of Yahweh until the evening, he and the elders of Israel; and they put dust on their heads.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Joshua rent his clothes, and fell to the earth upon his face before the ark of the LORD until the evening, he and the elders of Israel; and they put dust upon their heads.

    Definitions for Joshua 7:6

    Ark - Box; chest.
    Eventide - Messenger of good tidings.
    Rent - Divided; broke or tore apart.

    Clarke's Commentary on Joshua 7:6

    Joshua rent his clothes, etc. - It was not in consequence of this slight discomfiture, simply considered in itself, that Joshua laid this business so much to heart; but

    1. Because the people melted, and became as water, and there was little hope that they would make any stand against the enemy; and

    2. Because this defeat evidently showed that God had turned his hand against them. Had it not been so, their enemies could not have prevailed.

    Put dust upon their heads - Rending the clothes, beating the breast, tearing the hair, putting dust upon the head, and falling down prostrate, were the usual marks of deep affliction and distress. Most nations have expressed their sorrow in a similar way. The example of the distressed family of King Latinus, so affectingly related by Virgil, may be adduced in illustration of many passages in the history of the patriarchs, prophets, apostles, etc.

    Regina ut testis venientem prospicit hostem -

    Purpureos moritura manu discindit amictus -

    Filia prima manu flavos Lavinia crines,

    Et roseas laniata genas. -

    It scissa veste Latinus -

    Canitiem immundo perfusam pulvere turpans.

    Aen. lib. xii., ver. 594.

    "The queen, who saw the foes invade the town,

    And brands on tops of burning houses thrown,

    She raves against the gods, she beats her breast,

    continued...

    Barnes' Notes on Joshua 7:6

    On these signs of mourning, compare the marginal references and Leviticus 10:6; Numbers 20:6; 1 Samuel 4:12.

    Wesley's Notes on Joshua 7:6

    7:6 Rent his clothes - In testimony of great sorrow, for the loss felt, the consequent mischief feared, and the sin which he suspected. His face - In deep humiliation and fervent supplication. Until the even - tide - Continuing the whole day in fasting and prayer. Put dust upon their heads - As was usual in case of grief and astonishment.