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Jude 1:1

    Jude 1:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Jude, the servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James, to them that are sanctified by God the Father, and preserved in Jesus Christ, and called:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Jude, the servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James, to them that are sanctified by God the Father, and preserved in Jesus Christ, and called:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James, to them that are called, beloved in God the Father, and kept for Jesus Christ:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and the brother of James, to those of God's selection who have been made holy by God the Father and are kept safe for Jesus Christ:

    Webster's Revision

    Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James, to them that are called, beloved in God the Father, and kept for Jesus Christ:

    World English Bible

    Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James, to those who are called, sanctified by God the Father, and kept for Jesus Christ:

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Judas, a servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James, to them that are called, beloved in God the Father, and kept for Jesus Christ:

    Clarke's Commentary on Jude 1:1

    Jude, the servant of Jesus Christ - Probably Jude the apostle, who was surnamed Thaddeus and Lebbeus, was son to Alpheus, and brother to James the less, Joses, and Simon. See Matthew 10:3, and collate with Luke 6:16; Matthew 13:55.

    Brother of James - Supposed to be James the less, bishop of Jerusalem, mentioned here, because he was an eminent person in the Church. See the preface to St. James.

    To them that are sanctified by God - Instead of ἡγιασμενοις, to the sanctified, AB, several others, both the Syriac, Erpen's Arabic, Coptic, Sahidic, Armenian, Ethiopic, and Vulgate, with several of the fathers, have ηγαπημενοις, to them that are beloved; and before εν τῳ Θεῳ, in God, some MSS., with the Syriac and Armenian, have εθνεσιν, to the Gentiles, in God the Father: but although the first is only a probable reading, this is much less so. St. Jude writes to all believers everywhere, and not to any particular Church; hence this epistle has been called a general epistle. Sanctified signifies here consecrated to God through faith in Christ.

    Preserved in (or by) Jesus Christ - Signifies those who continued unshaken in the Christian faith; and implies also, that none can be preserved in the faith that do not continue in union with Christ, by whose grace alone they can be preserved and called. This should be read consecutively with the other epithets, and should be rather, in a translation, read first than last, to the saints in God the Father, called and preserved by Christ Jesus. Saints is the same as Christians; to become such they were called to believe in Christ by the preaching of the Gospel, and having believed, were preserved by the grace of Christ in the life and practice of piety.

    Barnes' Notes on Jude 1:1

    Jude, the servant of Jesus Christ - If the view taken in the Introduction to the Epistle is correct, Jude sustained a near relation to the Lord Jesus, being, as James was, "the Lord's brother," Galatians 1:19. The reasons why he did not advert to this fact here, as an appellation which would serve to designate him, and as showing his authority to address others in the manner in which he proposed to do in this Epistle, probably were,

    (1) that the right to do this did not rest on his mere "relationship" to the Lord Jesus, but on the fact that he had called certain persons to be his apostles, and had authorized them to do it; and,

    (2) that a reference to this relationship, as a ground of authority, might have created jealousies among the apostles themselves. We may learn from the fact that Jude merely calls himself "the servant of the Lord Jesus," that is, a Christian,

    (a) that this is a distinction more to be desired than, would be a mere natural relationship to the Saviour, and consequently.

    (b) that it is a higher honor than any distinction arising from birth or family. Compare Matthew 12:46-50.

    And brother of James - See the introduction, Section 1.

    To them that are sanctified by God the Father - To those who are "holy," or who are "saints." Compare the Romans 1:7 note; Philippians 1:1 note. Though this title is general, it can hardly be doubted that he had some particular saints in his view, to wit, those who were exposed to the dangers to which he refers in the Epistle. See Introduction, Section 3. As the Epistle was probably "sent" to Christians residing in a certain place, it was not necessary to designate them more particularly, though it was often done. The Syriac version adds here: "To the Gentiles who are called, beloved of God the Father," etc.

    And preserved in Jesus Christ - See the notes, 1 Peter 1:5. The meaning is, that they owed their preservation wholly to him; and if they were brought to everlasting life, it would be only by him. What the apostle here says of those to whom he wrote, is true of all Christians. They would all fall away and perish if it were not for the grace of God keeping them.

    And called - Called to be saints. See Romans 1:7 note; Ephesians 4:1 note.

    Wesley's Notes on Jude 1:1

    1:1 Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ - The highest glory which any, either angel or man, can aspire to. The word servant, under the old covenant, was adapted to the spirit of fear and bondage that clave to that dispensation. But when the time appointed of the Father was come, for the sending of his Son to redeem them that were under the law, the word servant (used by the apostles concerning themselves and all the children of God) signified one that, having the Spirit of adoption, is made free by the Son of God. His being a servant is the fruit and perfection of his being a son. And whenever the throne of God and of the Lamb shall be in the new Jerusalem, then will it be indeed that his servants shall serve him, Rev 22:3. The brother of James - St. James was the more eminent, usually styled, the brother of the Lord. To them that are beloved - The conclusion, Jude 1:21, exactly answers the introduction. And preserved through Jesus Christ - So both the spring and the accomplishment of salvation are pointed out. This is premised, lest any of them should be discouraged by the terrible things which are afterwards mentioned. And called - To receive the whole blessing of God, in time and eternity.
    Book: Jude