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Judges 21:25

    Judges 21:25 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    In those days there was no king in Israel: every man did that which was right in his own eyes.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    In those days there was no king in Israel: every man did that which was right in his own eyes.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    In those days there was no king in Israel: every man did that which was right in his own eyes.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    In those days there was no king in Israel: every man did what seemed right to him.

    Webster's Revision

    In those days there was no king in Israel: every man did that which was right in his own eyes.

    World English Bible

    In those days there was no king in Israel: every man did that which was right in his own eyes.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    In those days there was no king in Israel: every man did that which was right in his own eyes.

    Clarke's Commentary on Judges 21:25

    In those days there was no king in Israel - Let no one suppose that the sacred writer, by relating the atrocities in this and the preceding chapters, justifies the actions themselves; by no means. Indeed, they cannot be justified; and the writer by relating them gives the strongest proof of the authenticity of the whole, by such an impartial relation of facts that were highly to be discredit of his country.

    I Have already referred to the rape of the Sabine virgins. The story is told by Livy, Hist. lib. i., cap. 9, the substance of which is as follows: Romulus having opened an asylum at his new-built city of Rome for all kinds of persons, the number of men who flocked to his standard was soon very considerable; but as they had few women, or, as Livy says, penuria mulierum, a dearth of women, he sent to all the neighboring states to invite them to make inter-marriages with his people. Not one of the tribes around him received the proposal; and some of them insulted his ambassador, and said, Ecquod feminis quoque asylum aperuissent? Id enim demum compar connubium fore? "Why have you not also opened an asylum for Women, which would have afforded you suitable matches?" This exasperated Romulus, but he concealed his resentment, and, having published that he intended a great feast to Neptune Equester, invited all the neighboring tribes to come to it: they did so, and were received by the Romans with the greatest cordiality and friendship. The Sabines, with their wives and children, came in great numbers, and each Roman citizen entertained a stranger. When the games began, and each was intent on the spectacle before them, at a signal given, the young Romans rushed in among the Sabine women, and each carried off one, whom however they used in the kindest manner, marrying them according to their own rites with due solemnity, and admitting them to all the rights and privileges of the new commonwealth. The number carried off on this occasion amounted to near seven hundred; but this act of violence produced disastrous wars between the Romans and the Sabines, which were at last happily terminated by the mediation of the very women whose rape had been the cause of their commencement. The story may be seen at large in Livy, Plutarch, and others.

    Thus ends the book of Judges; a work which, while it introduces the history of Samuel and that of the kings of Judah and Israel, forms in some sort a supplement to the book of Joshua, and furnishes the only account we have of those times of anarchy and confusion, which extended nearly from the times of the elders who survived Joshua, to the establishment of the Jewish monarchy under Saul, David, and their successors. For other uses of this book, see the preface.

    Masoretic Notes on the Book of Judges

    The number of verses in this book is six hundred and eighteen.

    Its Masoretic chapters are fourteen.

    And its middle verse is Judges 10:8 : And that year they vexed and oppressed the children of Israel, etc.

    Corrected for a new edition, December 1, 1827. - A. C.

    Barnes' Notes on Judges 21:25

    The repetition of this characteristic phrase (compare Judges 17:6; Judges 18:1; Judges 19:1) is probably intended to impress upon us the idea that these disorders arose from the want of a sufficient authority to suppress them. The preservation of such a story, of which the Israelites must have been ashamed, is a striking evidence of the divine superintendence and direction as regards the Holy Scriptures.

    Wesley's Notes on Judges 21:25

    21:25 Right in his own eyes - What wonder was it then, if all wickedness overflowed the land? Blessed be God for magistracy!

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