Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Judges 6:36

    Judges 6:36 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Gideon said to God, If you will save Israel by my hand, as you have said,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by my hand, as thou hast spoken,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then Gideon said to God, If you are going to give Israel salvation by my hand, as you have said,

    Webster's Revision

    And Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by my hand, as thou hast spoken,

    World English Bible

    Gideon said to God, "If you will save Israel by my hand, as you have spoken,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast spoken,

    Definitions for Judges 6:36

    Save - Except; besides.

    Clarke's Commentary on Judges 6:36

    If thou wilt save Israel - Gideon was very bold, and God was very condescending. But probably the request itself was suggested by the Divine Spirit. On the miracle of the fleece, dew, and dry ground, Origen, in his eighth homily on the book of Judges, has many curious and interesting thoughts, I shall insert the substance of the whole: - The fleece is the Jewish nation. The fleece covered with dew, while all around is dry, the Jewish nation favored with the law and the prophets. The fleece dry, the Jewish nation cast off for rejecting the Gospel. All around watered, the Gospel preached to the Gentiles. and they converted to God. The fleece on the threshing-floor, the Jewish people in the land of Judea, winnowed, purged, and fanned by the Gospel. The dew wrung out into the bowl, the doctrines of Christianity, extracted from the Jewish writings, shadowed forth by Christ's pouring water into a basin, and washing the disciples' feet. The pious father concludes that he has now wrung this water out of the fleece of the book of Judges, as he hopes by and by to do out of the fleece of the book of Kings, and out of the fleece of the book of Isaiah or Jeremiah; and he has received it into the basin of his heart, and there conceived its true sense; and is desirous to wash the feet of his brethren, that they may be able to walk in the way of the preparation of the Gospel of peace. - Origen, Op. vol. ii., p. 475, edit. Benedict. All this to some will doubtless appear trifling; but it is not too much to say that scarcely any pious mind can consider the homily of this excellent man without drinking into a measure of the same spirit, so much sincerity, deep piety, and unction, appear throughout the whole: yet as I do not follow such practices, I cannot recommend them. Of dealers in such small wares, we have many that imitate Benjamin Keach, but few that come nigh to Origen.

    Barnes' Notes on Judges 6:36

    The caution of Gideon, desirous of being assured that he really had a promise from God, does not imply doubts as to God's faithfulness or power to fulfill His promise. Of such doubts there is not a trace in Gideon's character. He is a worthy example of faith Hebrews 11:32.

    Wesley's Notes on Judges 6:36

    6:36 Gideon said - In a way of humble supplication, for the strengthening his own faith, and for the greater encouragement of his soldiers in this great attempt.