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Judges 8:18

    Judges 8:18 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Then said he unto Zebah and Zalmunna, What manner of men were they whom ye slew at Tabor? And they answered, As thou art, so were they; each one resembled the children of a king.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Then said he to Zebah and Zalmunna, What manner of men were they whom you slew at Tabor? And they answered, As you are, so were they; each one resembled the children of a king.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Then said he unto Zebah and Zalmunna, What manner of men were they whom ye slew at Tabor? And they answered, As thou art, so were they; each one resembled the children of a king.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then he said to Zebah and Zalmunna, Where are the men whom you put to death at Tabor? And they gave answer, As you are, so were they; every one of them was like a king's son.

    Webster's Revision

    Then said he unto Zebah and Zalmunna, What manner of men were they whom ye slew at Tabor? And they answered, As thou art, so were they; each one resembled the children of a king.

    World English Bible

    Then he said to Zebah and Zalmunna, "What kind of men were they whom you killed at Tabor?" They answered, "They were like you. Each one resembled the children of a king."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Then said he unto Zebah and Zalmunna, What manner of men were they whom ye slew at Tabor? And they answered, As thou art, so were they; each one resembled the children of a king.

    Definitions for Judges 8:18

    Art - "Are"; second person singular.

    Clarke's Commentary on Judges 8:18

    What manner of men were they whom ye slew at Tabor? - We have no antecedent to this question; and are obliged to conjecture one: it seems as if Zebah and Zalmunna had massacred the family of Gideon, while he was absent on this expedition. Gideon had heard some confused account of it, and now questions them concerning the fact. They boldly acknowledge it, and describe the persons whom they slew, by which he found they were his own brethren. This determines him to avenge their death by slaying the Midianitish kings, whom he otherwise was inclined to save. He might have heard that his brethren had been taken prisoners, and might have hoped to have exchanged them for the kings now in his hand; but when he found they had been all slain, he decrees the death of their murderers. There is something in this account similar to that in the 12th Aeneis of Virgil: - When Turnus was overthrown, and supplicated for his life, and Aeneas was inclined to spare him; he saw the belt of his friend Pallas, whom Turnus had slain, and which he now wore as a trophy: this immediately determined the Trojan to sacrifice the life of Turnus to the manes of his friend. The story is well told: -

    Stetit acer in armis

    Aeneas, volvens oculos, dextramque repressit.

    Et jam jamque magis cunctantem flectere sermo

    Coeperat: infelix humero cum apparuit ingens

    Balteus, et notis fulserunt cingula bullis

    Pallantis pueri; victum quem vulnere Turnus

    Straverat, atque humeris inimicum insigne gerebat.

    Ille oculis postquam saevi monumenta doloris

    Exuviasque hausit: furiis accensus et ira

    Terribilis: Tune hinc spoliis indute meorum

    Eripiare mihi? - Pallas, te hoc vulnere Pallas

    Immolat; et poenam scelerato ex sanguine sumit.

    Hoc dicens furrum adverso sub pectore condit Fervidus.

    continued...

    Barnes' Notes on Judges 8:18

    What manner of men - literally, "Where are the men?" The sense, "what manner of men", is merely gathered from the tenor of the answer. Gideon doubtless knew that his brethren had been killed by Zebah and Zalmunna, and the desire of avenging their death was one motive for his impetuous pursuit and attack. His question was rather a taunt, a bitter reproach to his captives, preparing them for their fate. Zebah and Zalmunna, in their answer, did not give evidence against themselves. Their hope was by a flattering answer to soothe Gideon's wrath.

    Wesley's Notes on Judges 8:18

    8:18 What manner of men - For outward shape and quality. At Tabor - Whither he understood they fled for shelter, upon the approach of the Midianites; and where he learned that some were slain, which he suspected might be them. Resembled - Not for their garb, or outward splendor, but for the majesty of their looks: by which commendation they thought to ingratiate themselves with their conqueror.