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Leviticus 1:16

    Leviticus 1:16 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And he shall pluck away his crop with his feathers, and cast it beside the altar on the east part, by the place of the ashes:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And he shall pluck away his crop with his feathers, and cast it beside the altar on the east part, by the place of the ashes:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    and he shall take away its crop with the filth thereof, and cast it beside the altar on the east part, in the place of the ashes:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And he is to take away its stomach, with its feathers, and put it down by the east side of the altar, where the burned waste is put:

    Webster's Revision

    and he shall take away its crop with the filth thereof, and cast it beside the altar on the east part, in the place of the ashes:

    World English Bible

    and he shall take away its crop with its filth, and cast it beside the altar on the east part, in the place of the ashes.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and he shall take away its crop with the filth thereof, and cast it beside the altar on the east part, in the place of the ashes:

    Definitions for Leviticus 1:16

    Cast - Worn-out; old; cast-off.
    Crop - To pluck or break off.

    Clarke's Commentary on Leviticus 1:16

    Pluck away his crop with his feathers - In this sacrifice of fowls the head was violently wrung off, then the blood was poured out, then the feathers were plucked off, the breast was cut open, and the crop, stomach, and intestines taken out, and then the body was burnt. Though the bird was split up, yet it was not divided asunder. This circumstance is particularly remarked in Abram's sacrifice, Genesis 15:10. See Clarke's note Genesis 15:10. See Ainsworth. We have already seen, on Leviticus 1:2, that four kinds of animals might be made burnt-offerings to the Lord.

    1. Neat cattle, such as bulls, oxen, cows, and calves.

    2.-He-goats, she-goats, and kids.

    3. Rams, ewes, and lambs.

    4. Pigeons and turtle-doves; and in one case, viz., the cleansing of the leper, sparrows or some small bird.

    All these must be without spot or blemish - the most perfect of their respective kinds, and be wholly consumed by fire. The Rich were to bring the most costly; the Poor, those of least price. Even in this requisition of justice how much mercy was mingled! If a man could not bring a bullock or a heifer, a goat or a sheep, let him bring a calf, a kid, or a lamb. If he could not bring any of these because of his poverty, let him bring a turtle-dove, or a young pigeon, (see Leviticus 5:7); and it appears that in cases of extreme poverty, even a little meal or fine flour was accepted by the bountiful Lord as a sufficient oblation; see Leviticus 5:11. This brought down the benefits of the sacrificial service within the reach of the poorest of the poor; as we may take for granted that every person, however low in his circumstances, might be able to provide the tenth part of an ephah, about three quarts of meal, to make an offering for his soul unto the Lord. But every man must bring something; the law stooped to the lowest circumstances of the poorest of the people, but every man must sacrifice, because every man had sinned. Reader, what sort of a sacrifice dost thou bring to God? To Him thou owest thy whole body, soul, and substance; are all these consecrated to his service? Or has he the refuse of thy time, and the offal of thy estate? God requires thee to sacrifice as his providence has blessed thee. If thou have much, thou shouldst give liberally to God and the poor; If thou have but little, do thy diligence to give of that little. God's justice requires a measure of that which his mercy has bestowed. But remember that as thou hast sinned, thou needest a Savior. Jesus is that lamb without spot which has been offered to God for the sin of the world, and which thou must offer to him for thy sin; and it is only through Him that thou canst be accepted, even when thou dedicatest thy whole body, soul, and substance to thy Maker. Even when we present ourselves a living sacrifice to God, we are accepted for his sake who carried our sins, and bore our sorrows. Thanks be to God, the rich and the poor have equal access unto him through the Son of his love, and equal right to claim the benefits of the great sacrifice!

    Barnes' Notes on Leviticus 1:16

    His crop with his feathers - The weight of authority is in favor of the marginal rendering. It is most probable that the feathers were burned with the body, and that the wings, mentioned in Leviticus 1:17, were not mutilated.

    The place of the ashes - The ashes were daily removed from the altar (except on certain holy days) and thrown into a heap on its eastern side. When the heap became inconveniently large, it was removed in vessels appropriated to the purpose (see Exodus 27:3) to a spot without the camp. Leviticus 4:12; Leviticus 6:11.

    Wesley's Notes on Leviticus 1:16

    1:16 With its feathers - Or, with its dung or filth, contained in the crop and in the guts. On the east - Of the Tabernacle. Here the filth was cast, because this was the remotest place from the holy of holies, which was in the west - end; to teach us, that impure things and persons should not presume to approach to God, and that they should be banished from his presence. The place of the ashes - Where the ashes fell down and lay, whence they were afterwards removed without the camp.