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Leviticus 1:4

    Leviticus 1:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And he shall put his hand upon the head of the burnt offering; and it shall be accepted for him to make atonement for him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And he shall put his hand on the head of the burnt offering; and it shall be accepted for him to make atonement for him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And he shall lay his hand upon the head of the burnt-offering; and it shall be accepted for him to make atonement for him.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And he is to put his hand on the head of the burned offering and it will be taken for him, to take away his sin.

    Webster's Revision

    And he shall lay his hand upon the head of the burnt-offering; and it shall be accepted for him to make atonement for him.

    World English Bible

    He shall lay his hand on the head of the burnt offering, and it shall be accepted for him to make atonement for him.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And he shall lay his hand upon the head of the burnt offering; and it shall be accepted for him to make atonement for him.

    Definitions for Leviticus 1:4

    Atonement - A covering (for sin).

    Clarke's Commentary on Leviticus 1:4

    He shall put his hand upon the head of the burnt-offering - By the imposition of hands the person bringing the victim acknowledged,

    1. The sacrifice as his own.

    2. That he offered it as an atonement for his sins.

    3. That he was worthy of death because he had sinned, having forfeited his life by breaking the law.

    4. That he entreated God to accept the life of the innocent animal in place of his own.

    5. And all this, to be done profitably, must have respect to Him whose life, in the fullness of time, should be made a sacrifice for sin.

    6. The blood was to be sprinkled round about upon the altar, Leviticus 1:5, as by the sprinkling of blood the atonement was made; for the blood was the life of the beast, and it was always supposed that life went to redeem life.

    See Clarke on Exodus 29:10 (note). On the required perfection of the sacrifice see Clarke on Exodus 12:5 (note). It has been sufficiently remarked by learned men that almost all the people of the earth had their burnt-offerings, on which also they placed the greatest dependence. It was a general maxim through the heathen world, that there was no other way to appease the incensed gods; and they sometimes even offered human sacrifices, from the supposition, as Caesar expresses it, that life was necessary to redeem life, and that the gods would be satisfied with nothing less. "Quod pro vita hominis nisi vita hominis redditur, non posse aliter deorum immortalium numen placari arbitrantur." - Com. de Bell. Gal., lib. vi. But this was not the case only with the Gauls, for we see, by Ovid, Fast., lib. vi., that it was a commonly received maxim among more polished people: -

    " - Pro parvo victima parva cadit.

    Cor pro corde, precor, pro fibris sumite fibras.

    Hanc animam vobis pro meliore damus."

    See the whole of this passage in the above work, from ver. 135 to 163.

    Barnes' Notes on Leviticus 1:4

    And he shall put his hand upon the head of the burnt offering - The usual ceremony. By it the sacrificer identified himself with his victim Leviticus 3:2, Leviticus 3:8; Leviticus 4:15; Leviticus 8:14; Romans 12:1.

    To make atonement for him - This phrase belongs more especially to the sin-offerings and the trespass-offerings (compare Leviticus 4:20, Leviticus 4:26, Leviticus 4:31, Leviticus 4:35; Leviticus 5:16, Leviticus 5:18; Leviticus 6:7, etc.) It is not used in reference to the peace-offerings, and but rarely in reference to the burnt-offerings. It should be noticed that it is here introduced in close connection with the imposition of hands by the worshipper, not, as it is when it refers to the sin-offering, with the special functions of the priest, Leviticus 4:26, Leviticus 4:35; 2 Chronicles 29:23.

    Wesley's Notes on Leviticus 1:4

    1:4 He shall put his hand - Both his hands, Lev 8:14,18, and Lev 16:21. Whereby he signified, that he willingly gave it to the Lord. That he judged himself worthy of that death which it suffered in his stead; and that he laid his sins upon it with an eye to him upon whom God would lay the iniquity of us all, Isa 53:6, and that together with it he did freely offer up himself to God. To make atonement - Sacramentally; as directing his faith and thoughts to that true propitiatory sacrifice which in time was to be offered up for him. And although burnt - offerings were commonly offered by way of thanksgiving; yet they were sometimes offered by way of atonement for sin, that is, for sins in general, as appears from Job 1:5, but for particular sins there were special sacrifices.