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Leviticus 11:19

    Leviticus 11:19 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the stork, the heron after her kind, and the lapwing, and the bat.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the stork, the heron after her kind, and the lapwing, and the bat.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    and the stork, the heron after its kind, and the hoopoe, and the bat.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The stork and the heron, and birds of that sort, and the hoopoe and the bat.

    Webster's Revision

    and the stork, the heron after its kind, and the hoopoe, and the bat.

    World English Bible

    the stork, any kind of heron, the hoopoe, and the bat.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and the stork, the heron after its kind, and the hoopoe, and the bat.

    Clarke's Commentary on Leviticus 11:19

    The stork - חסידה chasidah, from חסד chasad, which signifies to be abundant in kindness, or exuberant in acts of beneficence; hence applied to the stork, because of its affection to its young, and its kindness in tending and feeding its parents when old; facts attested by the best informed and most judicious of the Greek and Latin natural historians. See Bochart, Scheuchzer, and Parkhurst, under the word חסד chasad. It is remarkable for destroying and eating serpents, and on this account might be reckoned by Moses among unclean birds.

    The heron - אנפה anaphah. This word has been variously understood: some have rendered it the kite, others the woodcock, others the curlew, some the peacock, others the parrot, and others the crane. The root אנף anaph, signifies to breathe short through the nostrils, to snuff, as in anger; hence to be angry: and it is supposed that the word is sufficiently descriptive of the heron, from its very irritable disposition. It will attack even a man in defense of its nest; and I have known a case where a man was in danger of losing his life by the stroke of a heron's bill, near the eye, who had climbed up into a high tree to take its nest. Bochart supposes a species of the eagle to be meant, vol. iii., col. 335.

    The lapwing - דוכיפת duchiphath, the upupa, hoopoe, or hoop, a crested bird, with beautiful plumage, but very unclean. See Bochart, and Scheuchzer. Concerning the genuine meaning of the original, there is little agreement among interpreters.

    The bat - עטלף atalleph, so called, according to Parkhurst, from עט at, to fly, and עלף alaph, darkness or obscurity, because it flies about in the dusk of the evening, and in the night: so the Septuagint νυκτερις, from νυξ, the night; and the Vulgate vespertilio, from vesper, the evening. This being a sort of monster partaking of the nature of both a bird and beast, it might well be classed among unclean animals, or animals the use of which in food should be avoided.

    Barnes' Notes on Leviticus 11:19

    The heron ... the lapwing - Rather, the great plover the hoopoe, so called from its peculiar cry.