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Leviticus 11:30

    Leviticus 11:30 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the ferret, and the chameleon, and the lizard, and the snail, and the mole.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the ferret, and the chameleon, and the lizard, and the snail, and the mole.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    and the gecko, and the land-crocodile, and the lizard, and the sand-lizard, and the chameleon.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the ferret and the land crocodile and the lizard and the sand-lizard and the chameleon.

    Webster's Revision

    and the gecko, and the land-crocodile, and the lizard, and the sand-lizard, and the chameleon.

    World English Bible

    the gecko, and the monitor lizard, the wall lizard, the skink, and the chameleon.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and the gecko, and the land-crocodile, and the lizard, and the sand-lizard, and the chameleon.

    Clarke's Commentary on Leviticus 11:30

    The ferret - אנקה anakah, from אנק anak, to groan, to cry out: a species of lizard, which derives its name from its piercing, doleful cry. See Bochart, vol. ii., col. 1066.

    The chameleon - כח coach. Bochart contends that this is the waril or guaril, another species of lizard, which derives its name from its remarkable strength and vigor in destroying serpents, the Hebrew כח cach signifying to be strong, firm, vigorous: it is probably the same with the mongoose, a creature still well known in India, where it is often domesticated in order to keep the houses free from snakes, rats, mice, etc.

    The lizard - לטאה letaah. Bochart contends that this also is a species of lizard, called by the Arabs wahara, which creeps close to the ground, and is poisonous.

    The snail - חמט chomet, another species of lizard, according to Bochart, called huluka by the Arabians, which lives chiefly in the sand - Vol. ii., col. 1075.

    The mole - תנשמת tinshameth, from נשם nasham, to breathe. Bochart seems to have proved that this is the chameleon, which has its Hebrew name from its wide gaping mouth, very large lungs, and its deriving its nourishment from small animals which float in the air, so that it has been conjectured by some to feed on the air itself - Vol. iii., col. 1073. A bird of the same name is mentioned Leviticus 11:18, which Bochart supposes to be the night-owl - Vol. iii., col. 286.