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Leviticus 11:5

    Leviticus 11:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the coney, because he cheweth the cud, but divideth not the hoof; he is unclean unto you.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the coney, because he chews the cud, but divides not the hoof; he is unclean to you.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And the coney, because he cheweth the cud but parteth not the hoof, he is unclean unto you.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the rock-badger, for the same reason, is unclean to you.

    Webster's Revision

    And the coney, because he cheweth the cud but parteth not the hoof, he is unclean unto you.

    World English Bible

    The coney, because he chews the cud but doesn't have a parted hoof, he is unclean to you.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the coney, because he cheweth the cud but parteth not the hoof, he is unclean unto you.

    Clarke's Commentary on Leviticus 11:5

    The coney - שפן shaphan, not the rabbit, but rather a creature nearly resembling it, which abounds in Judea, Palestine, and Arabia, and is called by Dr. Shaw daman Israel, and by Mr. Bruce ashkoko. As this creature nearly resembles the rabbit, with which Spain anciently abounded, Bochart supposes that the Phoenicians might have given it the name of שפניה spaniah, from the multitude of שפנים shephanim (or spanim, as others pronounce it) which were found there. Hence the emblem of Spain is a woman sitting with a rabbit at her feet. See a coin of Hadrian in Scheuchzer.

    Barnes' Notes on Leviticus 11:5

    The coney - The Old English name for a rabbit. The animal meant is the Hyrax Syriacus. It bears some resemblance to the guinea-pig or the marmot, and in its general appearance and habits Proverbs 30:26; Psalm 104:18, it might easily be taken for a rodent. But Cuvier discovered that it is, in its anatomy, a true pachyderm, allied to the rhinoceros and the tapir, inferior to them as it is in size.

    He cheweth the cud - The Hyrax has the same habit as the hare, the rabbit, the guinea-pig, and some other rodents, of moving its jaws when it is at rest as if it were masticating. The rodents were familiarly spoken of as ruminating animals, just as the bat was reckoned among birds because it flies (see Leviticus 11:19), and as whales and their congeners are spoken of as fish, when there is no occasion for scientific accuracy.

    Wesley's Notes on Leviticus 11:5

    11:5 As for the names of the following creatures, seeing the Jews themselves are uncertain and divided about them, it seems improper to trouble the unlearned readers with disputes about them.