Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Leviticus 13:47

    Leviticus 13:47 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The garment also that the plague of leprosy is in, whether it be a woollen garment, or a linen garment;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The garment also that the plague of leprosy is in, whether it be a woolen garment, or a linen garment;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The garment also that the plague of leprosy is in, whether it be a woollen garment, or a linen garment;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And any clothing of wool or of linen in which is the mark of the disease;

    Webster's Revision

    The garment also that the plague of leprosy is in, whether it be a woollen garment, or a linen garment;

    World English Bible

    "The garment also that the plague of leprosy is in, whether it is a woolen garment, or a linen garment;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The garment also that the plague of leprosy is in, whether it be a woollen garment, or a linen garment;

    Clarke's Commentary on Leviticus 13:47

    The garment also - The whole account here seems to intimate that the garment was fretted by this contagion; and hence it is likely that it was occasioned by a species of small animals, which we know to be the cause of the itch; these, by breeding in the garments, must necessarily multiply their kind, and fret the garments, i. e., corrode a, portion of the finer parts, after the manner of moths, for their nourishment. See Leviticus 13:52 (note).

    Barnes' Notes on Leviticus 13:47

    The garment - Rather, The clothing, referring to the ordinary dress of the Israelites in the wilderness; namely,, a linen tunic with a fringe Numbers 15:38 and a woolen cloak or blanket thrown on in colder weather.

    Wesley's Notes on Leviticus 13:47

    13:47 Leprosy in garments and houses is unknown in these times and places, which is not strange, there being some diseases peculiar to some ages and countries. And that such a thing was among the Jews, cannot reasonably be doubted; for, if Moses had been a deceiver, a man of his wisdom, would not have exposed himself to the contempt of his people by giving laws about that which their experience shewed to be but a fiction.