Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Leviticus 16:7

    Leviticus 16:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And he shall take the two goats, and present them before the LORD at the door of the tabernacle of the congregation.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And he shall take the two goats, and present them before the LORD at the door of the tabernacle of the congregation.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And he shall take the two goats, and set them before Jehovah at the door of the tent of meeting.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And he is to take the two goats and put them before the Lord at the door of the Tent of meeting.

    Webster's Revision

    And he shall take the two goats, and set them before Jehovah at the door of the tent of meeting.

    World English Bible

    He shall take the two goats, and set them before Yahweh at the door of the Tent of Meeting.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And he shall take the two goats, and set them before the LORD at the door of the tent of meeting.

    Definitions for Leviticus 16:7

    Tabernacle - A tent, booth or dwelling.

    Clarke's Commentary on Leviticus 16:7

    And he shall take the two goats - It is allowed on all hands that this ceremony, taken in all its parts, pointed out the Lord Jesus dying for our sins and rising again for our justification; being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit. Two goats are brought, one to be slain as a sacrifice for sin, the other to have the transgressions of the people confessed over his head, and then to be sent away into the wilderness. The animal by this act was represented as bearing away or carrying off the sins of the people. The two goats made only one sacrifice, yet only one of them was slain. One animal could not point out both the Divine and human nature of Christ, nor show both his death and resurrection, for the goat that was killed could not be made alive. The Divine and human natures in Christ were essential to the grand expiation: yet the human nature alone suffered, for the Divine nature could not suffer; but its presence in the human nature, while agonizing unto death, stamped those agonies, and the consequent death, with infinite merit. The goat therefore that was slain prefigured his human nature and its death; the goat that escaped pointed out his resurrection. The one shows the atonement for sin, as the ground of justification; the other Christ's victory, and the total removal of sin in the sanctification of the soul. Concerning these ceremonies we shall see farther particulars as we proceed. According to Maimonides fifteen beasts were offered on this day. "The daily, or morning and evening sacrifice, was offered as usual: besides a bullock, a ram, and seven lambs, all burnt-offerings; and a goat for a sin-offering, which was eaten in the evening. Then a bullock for a sin-offering, and this they burnt; and a ram for a burnt-offering: these both for the high priest. Then the ram for the consecration, (see Leviticus 16:5) which is called the people's ram. They brought also for the congregation two he-goats; the one for a sin-offering, the other for a scape-goat. Thus all the beasts offered on this great solemn day were Fifteen: the two daily sacrifices, one bullock, two rams, and seven lambs: all of these burnt-offerings. Two goats for sin-offerings; one offered without and eaten on the evening, the other offered within and burnt; and one bullock for a sin-offering for the high priest. The service of all these fifteen beasts is performed on this day by the high priest only." See Maimonides and Ainsworth on the place.