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Luke 1:1

    Luke 1:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For as much as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to draw up a narrative concerning those matters which have been fulfilled among us,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    As a number of attempts have been made to put together in order an account of those events which took place among us,

    Webster's Revision

    Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to draw up a narrative concerning those matters which have been fulfilled among us,

    World English Bible

    Since many have undertaken to set in order a narrative concerning those matters which have been fulfilled among us,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to draw up a narrative concerning those matters which have been fulfilled among us,

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 1:1

    Many have taken in hand - Great and remarkable characters have always many biographers. So it appears it was with our Lord: but as most of these accounts were inaccurate, recording as facts things which had not happened; and through ignorance or design mistaking others, especially in the place where St. Luke wrote; it seemed good to the Holy Spirit to inspire this holy man with the most correct knowledge of the whole history of our Lord's birth, preaching, miracles, sufferings, death, resurrection, and ascension, that the sincere, upright followers of God might have a sure foundation, on which they might safely build their faith. See the note on Luke 9:10.

    Most surely believed among us - Facts confirmed by the fullest evidence - των πεπληροφορημενων πραγματων. Every thing that had been done or said by Jesus Christ was so public, so plain, and so accredited by thousands of witnesses, who could have had no interest in supporting an imposture, as to carry the fullest conviction, to the hearts of those who heard and saw him, of the divinity of his doctrine, and the truth of his miracles.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 1:1

    Forasmuch as many - It has been doubted who are referred to here by the word "many." It seems clear that it could not be the other evangelists, for the gospel by "John" was not yet written, and the word "many" denotes clearly more than "two." Besides, it is said that they undertook to record what the "eye-witnesses" had delivered to them, so that the writers did not pretend to be eye-witnesses themselves. It is clear, therefore, that other writings are meant than the gospels which we now have, but what they were is a matter of conjecture. What are now known as spurious gospels were written long after Luke wrote his. It is probable that Luke refers to "fragments" of history, or to narratives of "detached" sayings, acts, or parables of our Lord, which had been made and circulated among the disciples and others. His doctrines were original, bold, pure, and authoritative. His miracles had been extraordinary, clear, and awful. His life and death had been peculiar; and it is not improbable - indeed it is highly probable that such broken accounts and narratives of detached facts would be preserved. That this is what Luke means appears farther from Luke 1:3, where "he" professes to give a regular, full, and systematic account from the very beginning - "having had perfect understanding of "all things from the very first." The records of the others - the "many" - were broken and incomplete. His were to be regular and full.

    Taken in hand - Undertaken, attempted.

    To set forth in order - To compose a narrative. It does not refer to the "order" or "arrangement," but means simply to give a narrative. The word rendered here "in order" is different from that in the third verse, which "has" reference "to order," or to a full and fair "arrangement" of the principal facts, etc., in the history of our Lord.

    A declaration - A narrative - an account of.

    Which are most surely believed among us - Among Christians - among all the Christians then living. Here we may remark:

    1. That Christians of that day had the best of all opportunities for knowing whether those things were true. Many had seen them, and all others had had the account from those who had witnessed them.

    2. That infidels now cannot "possibly" be as good judges in the matter as those who lived at the time, and who were thus competent to determine whether these things were true or false.

    3. That all Christians do "most surely believe" the truth of the gospel. It is their life, their hope, their all. Nor can they doubt that their Saviour lived, bled, died, rose, and still lives; that he was their atoning sacrifice, and that he is God over all, blessed forever.

    Wesley's Notes on Luke 1:1

    1:1-2 This short, weighty, artless, candid dedication, belongs to the Acts, as well as the Gospel of St. Luke. Many have undertaken - He does not mean St. Matthew or Mark; and St. John did not write so early. For these were eye witnesses themselves and ministers of the word.
    Book: Luke