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Luke 1:10

    Luke 1:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the whole multitude of the people were praying without at the time of incense.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the whole multitude of the people were praying without at the time of incense.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And the whole multitude of the people were praying without at the hour of incense.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And all the people were offering prayers outside, at the time of the burning of perfumes.

    Webster's Revision

    And the whole multitude of the people were praying without at the hour of incense.

    World English Bible

    The whole multitude of the people were praying outside at the hour of incense.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the whole multitude of the people were praying without at the hour of incense.

    Definitions for Luke 1:10

    Without - Outside.

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 1:10

    The whole multitude - were praying - The incense was itself an emblem of the prayers and praises of the people of God: see Psalm 141:2; Revelation 8:1. While, therefore, the rite is performing by the priest, the people are employed in the thing signified. Happy the people who attend to the spirit as well as the letter of every divine institution! Incense was burnt twice a day in the temple, in the morning and in the evening, Exodus 30:7, Exodus 30:8; but the evangelist does not specify the time of the day in which this transaction took place. It was probably in the morning.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 1:10

    The whole multitude - This was the regular time of evening prayer, and multitudes came up to the temple to worship.

    Praying without - That is, in the courts around the temple, particularly in the court of the women.

    Wesley's Notes on Luke 1:10

    1:10 The people were praying without, at the time of the incense - So the pious Jews constantly did. And this was the foundation of that elegant figure, by which prayer is in Scripture so often compared to incense. Perhaps one reason of ordaining incense might be, to intimate the acceptableness of the prayer that accompanied it; as well as to remind the worshippers of that sacrifice of a sweet - smelling savour, which was once to be offered to God for them, and of that incense, which is continually offered with the prayers of the saints, upon the golden altar that is before the throne, Rev 8:3,4.
    Book: Luke