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Luke 10:29

    Luke 10:29 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But he, willing to justify himself, said unto Jesus, And who is my neighbour?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But he, willing to justify himself, said to Jesus, And who is my neighbor?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But he, desiring to justify himself, said unto Jesus, And who is my neighbor?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But he, desiring to put himself in the right, said to Jesus, And who is my neighbour?

    Webster's Revision

    But he, desiring to justify himself, said unto Jesus, And who is my neighbor?

    World English Bible

    But he, desiring to justify himself, asked Jesus, "Who is my neighbor?"

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But he, desiring to justify himself, said unto Jesus, And who is my neighbour?

    Clarke's Commentary on Luke 10:29

    Willing to justify himself - Wishing to make it appear that he was a righteous man, and that consequently he was in the straight road to the kingdom of God, said, Who is my neighbor? supposing our Lord would have at once answered, "Every Jew is to be considered as such, and the Jews only." Now as he imagined he had never been deficient in his conduct to any person of his own nation, he thought he had amply fulfilled the law. This is the sense in which the Jews understood the word neighbor, as may be seen from Leviticus 19:15-18. But our Lord shows here, that the acts of kindness which a man is bound to perform to his neighbor when in distress, he should perform to any person, of whatever nation, religion, or kindred, whom he finds in necessity. As the word πλησιον signifies one who is near, Anglo Saxon, he that is next, this very circumstance makes any person our neighbor whom we know; and, if in distress, an object of our most compassionate regards. If a man came from the most distant part of the earth, the moment he is near you he has a claim upon your mercy and kindness, as you would have on his, were your dwelling-place transferred to his native country. It is evident that our Lord uses the word πλησιον (very properly translated neighbor, from nae or naer, near, and buer, to dwell) in its plain, literal sense. Any person whom you know, who dwells hard by, or who passes near you, is your neighbor while within your reach.

    Barnes' Notes on Luke 10:29

    To justify himself - Desirous to appear blameless, or to vindicate himself, and show that he had kept the law. Jesus wished to lead him to a proper view of his own sinfulness, and his real departure from the law. The man was desirous of showing that he had kept the law; or perhaps he was desirous of justifying himself for asking the question; of showing that it could not be so easily settled; that a mere reference to the "words" of the law did not determine it. It was still a question what was meant by "neighbor." The Pharisees held that the "Jews" only were to be regarded as such, and that the obligation did not extend at all to the Gentiles. The lawyer was probably ready to affirm that he had discharged faithfully his duty to his countrymen, and had thus kept the law, and could justify himself. Every sinner is desirous of "justifying himself." He seeks to do it by his own works. For this purpose he perverts the meaning of the law, destroys its spirituality, and brings "down" the law to "his" standard, rather than attempt to frame his life by "its" requirements.

    Wesley's Notes on Luke 10:29

    10:29 To justify himself - That is, to show he had done this. Lev 18:5.